Tag Archives: UFOs

Aliens in the home! UFOs sighted across the North East England are revealed

We are not alone in the North if the Ministry of Defence’s records of UFO sightings in the last decade or so is to be believed.

Scores of worried people have filed reports after fearing strange lights in the sky were evidence of little green men – with one person even claiming they’d seen an alien in their home.

Twenty six reports have been made of extra-terrestrial encounters since the year 2000, with fast moving, flashing lights the most common complaint.

These include someone in Carlisle who said “a UFO was seen and there was an alien in the witness’s house,” and in August 2004 at Greenside, near Ryton, Gateshead a report that cryptically says that the report is “only alien sightings above the house.”

Other “sightings” include “a three dimensional diamond shaped object, approx. size of a large helicopter,” at Wolsingham, Northumberland in 2005, and someone that called 999 after seeing an “orange ball shape going across the sky on a flight path” in November 2009.

In May 2003 someone reported a “black orb with five or six tassles underneath it” in Gateshead.

While someone else in Hetton-le-Hole was disturbed by “many lights seen up in the sky” in August 2006.

Some people were sure they had seen a UFO. One person reported “a black triangular UFO” that had three lights on Halloween in 2006.

Somebody else was concerned by “two bright orangey/red lights moving towards Durham Tees Valley Airport.” These lights “flew steady, level and straight”.

One of the more detailed accounts says “a silver pyramid that was rotating at a low speed and off centre” hovered over Sunderland in 2006.

Across the UK there were 1999 UFO sightings looked into by the Ministry of Defence between 2000 and November 2009, when the MoD stopped counting.

Nine people specifically mention aliens or something alien about their UFO sighting.

Elsewhere in the UK someone in Bristol reported that “a big alien craft” landed on their house in 2008. It then apparently flew off towards the city.

In April 2005 someone in Basildon said they saw a spaceship with grey aliens sitting on top of it above a bungalow.

Elsewhere in the North in 2001 brightly lit cone shaped objects were seen hovering and speeding along above Berwick, while in Darlington there were reports of “large number of lights flashing and moving around.”

A witness said: “There was white light – like a broad band and then tight! They made a circular sweep.”

While in Hartlepool in February 2009, someone reported that they “saw four spaceships that flew over the house into the sky.”

They had a bright light that faded and was then gone,” he said. “They returned to the same spot they had come from.”

And even Middlesbrough has got in on the act, when in September 2008, a “large, silent craft” was said to have “had bright green lights and a blue light that was moving quickly through the trees.”

Source –  Newcastle Evening Chronicle,  11 Oct 2014

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Almanac – May 18

1048 – Omar Khayyám born.  Persian polymath, philosopher, mathematician, astronomer and poet. He also wrote treatises on mechanics, geography, mineralogy, music, and Islamic theology.

Outside Iran and Persian speaking countries, Khayyám has had an impact on literature and societies through the translation of his works and popularization by other scholars.

The greatest such impact was in English-speaking countries; the English scholar Thomas Hyde (1636–1703) was the first non-Persian to study him.

The most influential of all was Edward FitzGerald (1809–83), who made Khayyám the most famous poet of the East in the West through his celebrated translation and adaptations of Khayyám’s rather small number of quatrains (Persian: رباعیات‎ rubāʿiyāt) in the Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam.

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1911 – Big Joe Turner born. American “blues shouter” (a blues-music singer capable of singing unamplified with a band) .

According to the songwriter Doc Pomus, “Rock and roll would have never happened without him.”

Although he had his greatest fame during the 1950s with his rock and roll recordings, particularly “Shake, Rattle and Roll”, Turner’s career as a performer endured from the 1920s into the 1980s.

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1913 – Charles Trenet born.  French singer and songwriter, most famous for his recordings from the late 1930s until the mid-1950s, though his career continued through the 1990s.

In an era in which it was exceptional for a singer to write their own material, Trenet wrote prolifically and declined to record any but his own songs.

While many of his songs mined relatively conventional topics such as love, Paris, and nostalgia for his younger days, what set Trenet’s songs apart were their personal, poetic, sometimes quite eccentric qualities, often infused with a warm wit. Some of his songs had unconventional subject matter, with whimsical imagery bordering on the surreal.

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1995 – Brinsley Le Poer Trench died. From 1956 to 1959 he edited the Flying Saucer Review and founded the International Unidentified Object Observer Corps.

In 1967, he founded Contact International and served as its first president. He also served as vice-president of the British UFO Research Association (BUFORA). He was an honorary life member of the now defunct Ancient Astronauts Society which supported the ideas put forward by Erich von Däniken in his 1968 book Chariots of the Gods?.

In 1975 he succeeded to the earldom of  Clancarty on the death of his half-brother, giving him a seat in the British House of Lords.

He used his new position to found a UFO Study Group at the  Lords, introducing Flying Saucer Review to its library and pushing for the declassification of UFO data.

Four years later he organised a celebrated debate in the House of Lords on UFOs which attracted many speeches on both sides of the question.

Trench also claimed to know a former U.S. test pilot who said he was one of six persons present at a meeting between President Eisenhower and a group of aliens, which allegedly took place at Edwards Air Force Base on April 4, 1954.

Clancarty reported that the test pilot told him “Five different alien craft landed at the base. Three were saucer-shaped and two were cigar shaped… the aliens looked something like humans, but not exactly.”

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1999 – Augustus Pablo died. Jamaican roots reggae and dub record producer, melodica player and keyboardist, active from the 1970s onwards.

He popularized the use of the melodica (an instrument at that time primarily used in Jamaica to teach music to schoolchildren) in reggae music, and was a committed Rastafarian.

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Almanac – December 17

1833 – Kaspar Hauser died. German youth who claimed to have grown up in the total isolation of a darkened cell. Hauser’s claims, and his subsequent death by stabbing, sparked much debate and controversy.

On 26 May 1828, a teenage boy appeared in the streets of Nuremberg, Germany. He carried a letter with him addressed to the captain of the 4th squadron of the 6th cavalry regiment, Captain von Wessenig. Its heading read: Von der Bäierischen Gränz / daß Orte ist unbenant / 1828 (“From the Bavarian border / The place is unnamed [sic] / 1828”).

The anonymous author said that the boy was given into his custody as an infant on 7 October 1812 and that he instructed him in reading, writing and the Christian religion, but never let him “take a single step out of my house”. The letter stated that the boy would now like to be a cavalryman “as his father was” and invited the captain either to take him in or to hang him.

There was another short letter enclosed purporting to be from his mother to his prior caretaker. It stated that his name was Kaspar, that he was born on 30 April 1812 and that his father, a cavalryman of the 6th regiment, was dead. In fact this letter was found to have been written by the same hand as the other one (whose line “he writes my handwriting exactly as I do” led later analysts to assume that Kaspar himself wrote both of them

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1938 – Carlo Little born.  Rock and roll drummer, based in the London nightclub scene in the 1960s. He played in an early version of The Rolling Stones, and  was also with Cyril Davies’ All Stars and was a founding member of Screaming Lord Sutch’s Savages.

He is credited with giving Keith Moon his sound and style. Little was the loudest drummer many had ever seen or heard, one of the first to ever hammer the bass drum. After a Savages show Moon begged Little to give him lessons, initially Carlo said no but reconsidered after thinking he could use the extra money.

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1969 – The United States Air Force closesd its study of UFOs – Project Blue Book, which had started in 1952.
It had two goals:

– to determine if UFOs were a threat to national security, and
– to scientifically analyze UFO-related data.

By the time Project Blue Book ended, it had collected 12,618 UFO reports, and concluded that most of them were misidentifications of natural phenomena (clouds, stars, etc.) or conventional aircraft. According to the National Reconnaissance Office a number of the reports could be explained by flights of the formerly secret reconnaissance planes U-2 and A-12. A small percentage of UFO reports were classified as unexplained, even after stringent analysis.

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2010 – Captain Beefheart died. Don Van Vliet, American musician, singer-songwriter, artist and poet widely known by the stage name Captain Beefheart. His music blended rock, blues and psychedelia with avant-garde and contemporary experimental composition.

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Almanac – September 18

St. Joseph of Cupertino’s Day
Patron saint of Astronauts

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1709 – Samuel Johnson born. English author who made lasting contributions to English literature as a poet, essayist, moralist, literary critic, biographer, editor and lexicographer.

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1905 – Greta Garbo born.  Swedish film actress and an international star and icon during Hollywood’s silent and classic periods. Many of her films were sensational hits, and all but three of her twenty-four Hollywood films were profitable.

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1911 – Brinsley Le Poer Trench born. Trench – who was also 8th Earl of Clancarty – was a firm believer in flying saucers, and in particular, the Hollow Earth theory, ideas he discussed in his book Secret of the Ages: UFOs from Inside the Earth. He also claimed that he could trace his descent from 63,000 BC, when beings from other planets had landed on Earth in spaceships.
Most humans, he said, were descended from these aliens: “This accounts for all the different colour skins we’ve got here,” he said in 1981. A few of these early aliens did not come from space, he explained, but emerged through tunnels from a civilisation which “still existed beneath the Earth’s crust.” There were seven or eight of these tunnels altogether, one at the North Pole, another at the South Pole, and others in such places as Tibet. “I haven’t been down there myself,” he said, “but from what I gather [these beings] are very advanced.”

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1939 – The Nazi propaganda broadcaster known as Lord Haw-Haw began transmitting. It was the nickname of several announcers on the English-language propaganda radio programme Germany Calling, broadcast by Nazi German radio to audiences in Great Britain on the medium wave station Reichssender Hamburg and by shortwave to the United States, though it later came to be exclusively applied to   William Joyce, who was German radio’s most prominent English-language speaker.

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1964 – Sean O’Casey died.  Irish dramatist and memoirist. A committed socialist, he was the first Irish playwright of note to write about the Dublin working classes.

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1970 – Jimi Hendrix died.  American musician and singer-songwriter. Widely considered to be the greatest electric guitarist in music history and one of the most influential musicians of his era despite his mainstream exposure being limited to four years.

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2004 – Russ Meyer died. American  motion picture director, producer, screenwriter, cinematographer, editor, actor and photographer,  known primarily for writing and directing a series of successful low-budget sexploitation films that featured campy humor, sly satire and large-breasted women, including such notable films as Faster, Pussycat! Kill! Kill! (1965) and Vixen! (1968).

Faster Pusycat Kill ! Kill ! is one of my all-time favorite films.

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Fencehouses 3rd September UFOs

September 3rd used to have a reputation of being a day of weird shit (see Almanac entry), and the North East England village of Fencehouses, near Houghton-le-Spring,  appears to have some affinity with this date and UFOs. If I’d been planning ahead, I might have gone there tonight… or maybe not. I’ve seen the place by daylight – the thought of it after dark does not appeal.

But anyway…

 

2010 – From the British Earth & Aeriel Mysteries Society website: http://www.beamsinvestigations.org/

“On Friday the 3rd of September 2010, me and my partner were on our way to Houghton from Chester Le Street and coming through Fencehouses, when we saw a red ball in the sky. At first I thought it was Mars but it looked odd and before our eyes, it changed to orange. It gave the appearance of being very far away, but then all of a sudden we drove under it and that was that…”

This is interesting, because On September 3, 1976 an elderly woman and her eighteen year old niece saw a grounded UFO at Fencehouses. It was a  small object, about three-and-a-half feet by five feet, with a smooth glassy surface that the older woman says she touched. On top was a small orange dome, and it was sitting on sledge-like runners of steel or chrome. The witnesses were attracted towards it and appeared to enter a hypnotic state where time stood still. They met two tiny beings with long hair, but no communication ensued. They then lost all sense of time, and the object shot upwards making a humming noise.

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This account is interesting if you subscribe to the theory that the UFOnauts of today are the Fairy Folk of yesteryear with an updated image. If that was the case, the Fencehouses entities almost seem to be in the process of metamorphing from one state to the other – tiny beings and the UFO on  sledge-like runners.

And a small orange dome… related in any way to the red / orange ball in the 2010 account ?

Fencehouses is about 7 or 8 miles from where I sit writing this. I once mentioned the close encounter to a woman who came from the village – she was aghast: “What the hell did they want to go there for ?”  – her point of view being that if you had the travel opportunities that a UFO afforded, Fencehouses would be a very long way down the list of desirable locations to visit, and I must agree she had a point. The UFOs evidently like it, though.

I once worked for a couple of months with the infamous Bird Man of Fencehouses. But that’s another tale altogether…

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Almanac – June 30th

1837 – An act of parliament put an end to the use of the pillory as punishment in the Uk.

1859 – French acrobat Charles Blondin crossed Niagara Falls on a tightrope.

1905Albert Einstein publishesd the article On the Electrodynamics of Moving Bodies, in which he introduces special relativity.

1908 – The Tunguska Event occured in  Siberia –  an enormously powerful explosion that occurred near the Podkamennaya Tunguska River in what is now Krasnoyarsk Krai, Russia, at about 7:14 a.m. KRAT (0:14 UT).

The explosion, having the hypocenter, (60.886°N, 101.894°E), is believed to have been caused by the air burst of a large meteoroid or comet fragment at an altitude of 5–10 kilometres (3–6 mi) above the Earth’s surface. Different studies have yielded varying estimates of the object’s size, with general agreement that it was a few tens of metres across. It is the largest impact event on or near Earth in recorded history.

The explosion knocked an estimated 80 million trees down over an area covering 2,150 square kilometres (830 sq mi). It is estimated that the shock wave from the blast would have measured 5.0 on the Richter scale.

Other possible causes suggested include a crashing UFO, a Black hole passing through the Earth, anti-matter, and a side-effect of an experiment by Nikola Tesla

 

1934The Night Of The Long Knives in Germany. Adolf Hitler ordered the summary execution of those in the Nazi party who oppsed him.

 

Mr. Frankenstein

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Almanac – June 24th

MIDSUMMER DAY

In Great Britain from the 13th century, Midsummer was celebrated on Midsummer Eve (St. John’s Eve, June 23) and St. Peter’s Eve (June 28) with the lighting of bonfires, feasting and merrymaking.

In late fifteenth-century England, John Mirk of Lilleshall Abbey, Shropshire, gives the following description:

At first, men and women came to church with candles and other lights and prayed all night long. In the process of time, however, men left such devotion and used songs and dances and fell into lechery and gluttony turning the good, holy devotion into sin.

The church fathers decided to put a stop to these practices and ordained that people should fast on the evening before, and thus turned waking into fasting .

Mirk adds that at the time of his writing,

…in worship of St John the Baptist, men stay up at night and make three kinds of fires: one is of clean bones and no wood and is called a “bonnefyre”; another is of clean wood and no bones, and is called a wakefyre, because men stay awake by it all night; and the third is made of both bones and wood and is called, “St. John’s fire”.

These traditions largely ended after the Reformation, but persisted in rural areas up until the nineteenth century before petering out.

637 – The Battle of Moira was fought between the High King of Ireland and the Kings of Ulster and Dalriada. It is claimed to be largest battle in the history of Ireland.

1314 –The Battle of Bannockburn concluded with a decisive victory by Scottish forces led by Robert the Bruce, though England did not  finally recognize Scottish independence until 1328 .

1374 – A sudden outbreak of St. John’s Dance caused people in the streets of Aachen, Germany, to experience hallucinations and begin to jump and twitch uncontrollably until they collapsed from exhaustion.

1519 – Lucrezia Borgia died.

1717 – The Premier Grand Lodge of England, the first Masonic Grand Lodge in the world (now the United Grand Lodge of England), was founded in London, England.

1901 – Birth of Harry Partch, American composer

1916 – The First Battle Of The Somme began.

1916 Mary Pickford became the first female film star to sign a million dollar contract.

1935 –  Birth of Terry Riley, American composer

1947 – The modern UFO age could be said to have begun – Kenneth Arnold, flying near Mount Rainier, Washington State, USA, encountered 9 unidentified flying objects.
He was later to describe their motion as: “like a saucer would if you skipped it across water” – and thus the term Flying Saucer was born.
Personally, I like another quote he made to reporters: “It seems impossible, but there it is.” A good motto for Forteans everywhere.

1968 – Death of Tony Hancock, British comedian

1985 – STS-51-G Space Shuttle Discovery completed its mission, best remembered for having Sultan bin Salman bin Abdulaziz Al Saud, the first Arab and first Muslim in space, as a Payload Specialist. And maybe a contender for the title of astronaut with the longest name ?

2007 – Death of Derek Dougan, Northern Irish footballer. The name might not mean much to you, but he was my first sporting idol, playing for Wolverhampton Wanderers. I wrote asking him for his autograph, and he sent a signed photo back – pretty thrilling for a 9- or 10-year old. I’d like to say that I still have the photo, but sadly it vanished over the intervening years.

Mr. Frankenstein

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