Tag Archives: Sterling Morrison

Almanac – August 30

1797 – Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley born. English novelist, short story writer, dramatist, essayist, biographer, and travel writer, best known for her Gothic novel Frankenstein: or, The Modern Prometheus (1818). She also edited and promoted the works of her husband, the Romantic poet  Percy Bysshe Shelley. Her father was the political philosopher William Godwin, and her mother was the philosopher and feminist Mary Wollstonecraft.

.

.
1812 – The Observer reported: “Mr. J. Toupin, while on a sailing expedition last week, with a party of ladies and gentlemen, about a mile from Exmouth Bay, discovered an animal resembling the description given of the Mermaid.

One of the boatmen threw it some pieces of boiled fish, which it ate with apparent relish. A medical gentleman offered a reward of 20 pounds…in consequence of which all the fishermen are busily preparing to ensnare it.”

.

1918 – London’s policemen went on strike against wages lower that those of unskilled workers, long hours, badly organized and unpaid overtime. Technically a mutiny, the action ended when concessions were granted.

Lloyd George was later to claim that Britain was “nearer to Bolshevism” that night than she was ever to be again.

.

1995 – Sterling Morrison died. Guitarist with The Velvet Underground. Victim of  non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma.

.

Leave a comment

Filed under Almanac

Almanac – August 28

1814 – Sheridan Le Fanu born.  Irish writer of Gothic tales and mystery novels. He was the leading ghost-story writer of the nineteenth century and was central to the development of the genre in the Victorian era. Perhaps best remembered for Carmilla, a compelling tale of a lesbian vampire, set in central Europe. This story was to greatly influence Bram Stoker in the writing of Dracula and also inspired several films, including Hammer’s The Vampire Lovers and  Roger Vadim’s  Blood and Roses .
.


.

1833 – The Slavery Abolition Act 1833 received Royal Assent, abolishing slavery through most the British Empire.

.

1906 – John Betjeman born. English poet, writer and broadcaster. He was a founding member of the Victorian Society and a passionate defender of Victorian architecture. Starting his career as a journalist, he ended it as one of the most popular British Poets Laureate to date.

.

1942 – Sterling Morrison born.  Guitarist with The Velvet Underground.

.

.

1955 – Black teenager Emmett Till  murdered in Mississippi, aged 14, after reportedly flirting with a white woman , an event that galvanized  the nascent American Civil Rights Movement.

Till was from Chicago, Illinois, visiting his relatives in the Mississippi Delta region when he spoke to 21-year-old Carolyn Bryant, the married proprietor of a small grocery store. Several nights later, Bryant’s husband Roy and his half-brother J. W. Milam arrived at Till’s great-uncle’s house where they took Till, transported him to a barn, beat him and gouged out one of his eyes, before shooting him through the head and disposing of his body in the Tallahatchie River.

.

.

well, now you can count them one by one
it-could-be-your-son,
and you can count them two by two,
it-could-be-me-and-you
well, into-the-river-they-go, into-the-river-they-go,
now you can count them five by five,
now-they-don’t-come-out-a-live.
now you can count them six by six
in-Mississippi, they-got-it-fixed.
now you can count them seven by seven,
Mississippi, it-ain’t-no-heav-en
now you can count them eight by eight,
and-they-were thrown-in-because-of-hate.
now you can count them Nine by Nine
and Mississippi this a no Crime
you can count them Ten by Ten
and you would wonder when the right win

.

Leave a comment

Filed under Almanac