Tag Archives: South Africa

Thatcher Dead – Her Spawn Live On

Well, I suppose if I can find one good thing to say about Thatcher,  its that she didn’t  encourage the fruit of her loins – the terrible twins Carol and Mark – to follow her into politics.

Carol has followed some kind of career in journalism, as an author (biographies of mummy and daddy) and a “personality”.  A very annoying personality, and one no-one would have entertained on national media had it not been for her parentage.

She did have her moments.

In 2007 she travelled to the Falkland Islands and Argentina for the documentary Mummy’s War...

During her stay in Argentina she met a group of mothers who lost their sons during the conflict and stated, with all the sensitivity of her mother – “We were fighting a war; we won, you lost,” and reminded them that it was their country that invaded the islands, thus initiating the conflict. The interview ended with one of the women claiming that “God will punish her (Margaret Thatcher)”.

And diplomatic as ever, in 2009 she got the heave-ho from the BBC for making racist comments about a black tennis player.

Still, even with the insensitivity and casual racism, she’s like Snow White compared to her slimy sibling Mark.

During the mid- to late 1980s concerns were frequently expressed in relation to his business affairs. In 1984 his mother faced questions in the House of Commons in relation to his involvement in representing a British company Cementation, a subsidiary of Trafalgar House to build a university in Oman at a time when the prime minister was urging Omanis to buy British.

He has denied claims made that in 1985 he received millions of pounds in commission in relation to the £45 billion Al-Yamamah arms deal, a controversial arms sale by BAE to Saudi Arabia which was possibly the largest arms sale ever; he has not disputed that a house in Belgravia , London was purchased for him for £1 million in 1987 by an offshore company controlled by Wafic Said, a middleman in the deal.

In 1986 his mother faced questions in the House of Commons again over her son’s relationship with the Sultan of Brunei. The government’s PR advisers suggested that it would be best if he left the country !

So he was banished to Texas, and later spent time in Switzerland as a tax exile until he was forced to leave when the Swiss authorities started to question his residency qualifications.

Back in the USA in 1996 he was prosecuted for tax evasion, at which point he moved to South Africa.

In 1998 South African authorities investigated a company owned by Thatcher for allegedly running loan shark operations. According to the Star of Johannesburg’, the company had offered unofficial small loans to hundreds of police officers, military personnel and civil servants and then pursued them with debt collectors.

In 2003, following the death of his father he assumed the title of ‘Sir’ due to his Thatcher Baronetcy , a year before he was arrested in South Africa in connection with the 2004 Equatorial Guinea coup d’état attempt to which he pleaded guilty of breaking anti-mercenary legislation in January 2005. At this time the Sunday Times suggested that he had personal assets of £60 million, most of which was in offshore accounts.

He moved to Monaco on a temporary residency permit.His Monaco residency was not renewed as he was said to be on a list of ‘undesirables’ who would not be allowed further residency and he was required to leave by mid-2006.

He was refused a entry visa to the USA due to his conviction in South Africa.

He was refused residency in Switzerland and settled in Gibraltar where he married his second wife in 2008. In 2013 he was reported to spend most of his time in Marbella.  Arguably, anyone else with a comparable record would spend most of his time in prison.

I do hope someone at the Tax authorities is checking up to see how much UK tax he has avoided over the years.

My god, what a dysfunctional family !

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Almanac – December 23

1688 – King James II of England fled England to  France after being deposed in favor of his nephew, William of Orange and his daughter Mary.

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1935 – Esther Phillips born. American R&B and Soul singer.

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1938 – Discovery of the first modern Coelacanth,  off South Africa. A rare order of fish,  they follow the oldest known living lineage of Sarcopterygii (lobe-finned fish and tetrapods), which makes more closely related to lungfish, reptiles and mammals than to the common ray-finned fishes.  and were thought to have gone extinct in the Late Cretaceous.  They are considered a “living fossil” due to an apparent lack of significant evolution over the past millions of years –  the Coelacanth is thought to have evolved into roughly its current form approximately 400 million years ago.

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Almanac – October 09

1635 –  Roger Williams was banished from the Massachusetts Bay Colony as a religious dissident.  An English Protestant theologian, he was an early proponent of religious freedom and the separation of church and state. In 1636, he began the colony of Providence Plantation, which provided a refuge for religious minorities, and started the first Baptist church in America. He was a student of Native American languages and an advocate for fair dealings with Native Americans. Williams was arguably the very first abolitionist in North America, having organized the first attempt to prohibit slavery in any of the original thirteen colonies.
He was tried by the General Court and convicted of sedition and heresy, the Court declaring  that he was spreading “diverse, new, and dangerous opinions”.

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1920 – Yusef Lateef born, American jazz multi-instrumentalist, composer, and educator.

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1934 – Abdullah Ibrahim born. South African pianist and composer, his music reflects many of the musical influences of his childhood in the multicultural port areas of Cape Town, ranging from traditional African songs to the gospel of the AME Church and ragas, to more modern jazz and other Western styles. Ibrahim is considered the leading figure in the sub-genre Cape jazz.

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1967 – A day after being captured, Marxist revolutionary Ernesto “Che” Guevara is executed for attempting to incite a revolution in Bolivia.

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1978 – Jacques Brel died. Belgian singer-songwriter who composed and performed literate, thoughtful, and theatrical songs that generated a large, devoted following in France initially, and later throughout the world.

He was widely considered a master of the modern chanson, and although he recorded most of his songs in French, he became a major influence on English-speaking songwriters and performers such as David Bowie, Leonard Cohen, Marc Almond and Rod McKuen. English translations of his songs were recorded by many top performers, including Ray Charles, Judy Collins, John Denver, the Kingston Trio, Nina Simone, Frank Sinatra, Scott Walker, and Andy Williams.He has sold over 25 million records worldwide. 

In French-speaking countries, Brel was also a successful actor, appearing in ten films. He also directed two films, one of which, Le Far West, was nominated for the Palme d’Or at the Cannes Film Festival in 1973.

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1989 – An official news agency in the Soviet Union reported the landing of a UFO in Voronezh. The alleged landing occurred the previous month in the city’s park, and subsequently led to encounters between citizens and extraterrestrial beings.

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1992 – A 13 kilogram (est.) fragment of the Peekskill meteorite landed on the driveway of the Knapp residence in Peekskill, New York, destroying the family’s 1980 Chevrolet Malibu.

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Almanac – August 18

1587 – The first child of English parents to be born in the American colonies, a girl named Virginia Dare.

1634 – Urbain Grandier, Catholic priest,  accused and convicted of sorcery, was burned alive in Loudun, France, following the events of the so-called “Loudun Possessions.”
In 1632, a group of nuns from the local Ursuline convent had  accused him of having bewitched them, sending the demon Asmodai, among others, to commit evil and impudent acts with them.

1685 – In the wake of the failed Monmouth Rebellion, Judge Jeffreys began sentencing people to death at what became known as the Bloody Assizes.

1958 – Vladimir Nabokov‘s controversial novel Lolita  published in the United States.

1977 – Steve Biko was arrested at a police roadblock under the Terrorism Act No 83 of 1967 in King William’s Town, South Africa. He would later die of the injuries sustained during this arrest,  bringing attention to South Africa’s apartheid policies.

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