Tag Archives: sea

Dolphins more common in North East waters than any other part of England

A pod of up to 100 dolphins has been spotted off the coast at Tynemouth, Tyne & Wear.

And marine experts say the region is currently the best place in the country to spot the mammals.

Both bottlenose and white-beaked dolphins have been sighted in the area over recent days.

Stephen Marsh, from British Divers Marine Life Rescue, said: “White-beaked dolphins are abundant in the North Sea at the minute.

“The ones spotted off Tynemouth have most probably come down from the Farne Islands.

“We have seen a pod of up to 100 passing the region in recent days and the area is by far the best to see these type of dolphins at the minute.

“The reason there are so many is due to the movement of their prey.”

Bottlenose dolphins have also been spotted off the coast at Roker in Sunderland in recent weeks.

Fishermen just outside Roker Harbour reported seeing the mammals jumping as they moved up the coast towards Seaburn.

Experts say the pods could well be attracted to the high numbers of mackerel shoals.

Terry McKeone, senior aquarist at Tynemouth’s Bluereef Aquarium, said: “Mackerel are quite a dim fish and they hang around in large shoals.

“They are close to the shore in the area at the minute so it could be the dolphins are just rounding them up and hitting them in large numbers.

“Dolphins are social mammals and they tend to be seen in large groups. You might get the occasional one by himself but that’s usually because the other dolphins don’t like him.”

Michael Jeffrey,  from Roker, said: “We’ve had the dolphins off the coast for the past few weeks, they’ve attracted quite a bit of attention.”

The white-beaked dolphin is most widely spotted in the North Atlantic Ocean.

Source –  Newcastle Journal,  02 July 2014

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Medieval Monk’s Bones Eroded From Cliff

The remains of an 800-year-old monk have been uncovered, poking out of a cliff face in the Vale of Glamorgan.

They were spotted by walker Mandy Ewington at Monknash, which was a burial ground for Cistercian monks in the Middle Ages.

The leg bones are thought to belong to a monk from the 1200s. Credit: Wales News Service

Archaeologist Mr Langford said: “You can clearly see a grave has been eroded into the sea. What is fascinating is you can see the two femurs being slowly revealed as the cliffs are eroded away.”

“There was a monastic community close to the area and these bones indicate a male in their late 20s who was in good health.”

“I would say they belong to a monk from the 1200s, due to previous archaeological digs in the past, the depth of the bones in the cliff and the history of the area.”

“He would likely be buried with nothing except two shroud rings which would have held his burial shroud in place at the head and feet.”

He said the winter storms had caused large parts of the British coastline to collapse and archaeological sites were being revealed and lost to the sea.

Source –  ITV Wales,  10 March 2014

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