Tag Archives: Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Almanac – October 21

1772 – Samuel Taylor Coleridge born. English poet, literary critic and philosopher who, with his friend William Wordsworth, was a founder of the Romantic Movement in England and a member of the Lake Poets. He is probably best known for his poems The Rime of the Ancient Mariner and Kubla Khan, as well as for his major prose work Biographia Literaria. His critical work, especially on Shakespeare, was highly influential, and he helped introduce German idealist philosophy to English-speaking culture.

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1867 – Medicine Lodge Treaty – Near Medicine Lodge, Kansas a landmark treaty was signed by southern Great Plains Indian leaders. The treaty required Native American Plains tribes to relocate to a reservation in western Oklahoma.

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1917 – Dizzy Gillespie born. American jazz trumpeter, bandleader, composer and occasional singer.

During the 1964 United States presidential campaign Gillespie, with tongue in cheek, put himself forward as an independent write-in candidate.He promised that if he were elected, the White House would be renamed The Blues House, and a cabinet composed of Duke Ellington (Secretary of State), Miles Davis (Director of the CIA), Max Roach (Secretary of Defense), Charles Mingus (Secretary of Peace), Ray Charles (Librarian of Congress), Louis Armstrong (Secretary of Agriculture), Mary Lou Williams (Ambassador to the Vatican), Thelonious Monk (Travelling Ambassador) and Malcolm X (Attorney General).

What a chance America missed !

In 1971 Gillespie announced he would run again  but withdrew before the election for reasons connected to the Bahá’í Faith.

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1921 – American President Warren G. Harding delivered the first speech by a sitting President against lynching in the deep south

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1924 – Celia Cruz born.  Cuban-American salsa performer. One of the most popular salsa artists of the 20th century, she earned twenty-three gold albums and was renowned internationally as the “Queen of Salsa” as well as “La Guarachera de Cuba.”

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1944 – The first kamikaze attack: A Japanese plane carrying a 200 kilograms (440 lb) bomb attacked  HMAS Australia off Leyte Island, as the Battle of Leyte Gulf began.

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1957 – Julian Cope born. English rock musician, author, antiquary, musicologist, poet and cultural commentator. Also a recognised authority on Neolithic culture, an outspoken political and cultural activist with a noted and public interest in occultism and paganism.

As an author and commentator, he has written two successive volumes of autobiography called Head-On (1994) and Repossessed (1999), two volumes of archaeology called The Modern Antiquarian (1998) and The Megalithic European (2004) and two volumes of musicology called Krautrocksampler (1995) and Japrocksampler (2007).

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1967 – Vietnam War: More than 100,000 war protesters gathered in Washington, D.C.. A peaceful rally at the Lincoln Memorial was followed by a march to The Pentagon and clashes with soldiers and United States Marshals protecting the facility. Similar demonstrations occurred simultaneously in Japan and Western Europe.

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1969 – Jack Kerouac died. American novelist and poet,  considered a literary iconoclast and, alongside William S. Burroughs and Allen Ginsberg, a pioneer of the Beat Generation.  Kerouac died, aged 47,  from internal bleeding due to long-standing abuse of alcohol.

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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_MjPtem6ZbE

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Almanac – July 25th

St James’s Day – in 1782, John Knill had constructed a 3-sided stone obelisk on a hill outside of St. Ives, Cornwall, which becamr known as Knill’s Steeple.He intended it originally to be his mausoleum, but it was never used as such.
However, he did draw up a complicated deed which gave strict instructions for a ceremony to take place at the Steeple ever 5 years on the feast of St. James – today.
The ceremony involved 10 girls[who must be the daughters of fishermen, tinners or seamen], 2 widows, a fiddler and 3 trustees [the mayor, vicar and customs officer of the day].
The girls were to dance around the Steeple to Cornish tunes played on the fiddle, and then everyone was to sing the 100th Psalm. Knill attended the first ceremony himself in 1801.

1834 – Samuel Taylor Coleridge died. English poet,  Romantic, literary critic and philosopher who, with his friend William Wordsworth, was a founder of the Romantic Movement in England and a member of the Lake Poets. He is probably best known for his poems The Rime of the Ancient Mariner and Kubla Khan, as well as for his major prose work Biographia Literaria.

1965 – Bob Dylan went electric as he plugs in at the Newport Folk Festival, signaling a major change in folk and rock music.

1976 – : Viking 1 took  the famous Face on Mars photo.

1984 – Big Mama Thornton died, American singer, she was the first to record “Hound Dog”, in 1952 – the song was #1 on the Billboard R&B charts for seven weeks in 1953 and  sold almost two million copies. Three years later, Elvis Presley recorded his version.

She also  wrote and recorded “Ball ‘n’ Chain,” which became a hit for her and later for  Janis Joplin,

 

 

Mr. Frankenstein

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