Tag Archives: Rome

Vial of John Paul II’s Blood ‘Stolen by Satanists’

A vial containing the late Pope John Paul II’s blood has been stolen from a small church in central Italy along with a cross, according to reports.

The tube contained bloodied clothing from the botched assassination attempt on the Pope , and is  one of only three known vials containing the blood of the Polish Pope, who is expected to be declared a saint in a ceremony at the Vatican on 27 April.
They are considered to be of great religious significance. but this  is not the first time one of them has been stolen. In 2012 a priest travelling north from Rome had his backpack stolen by three thieves. It contained an intricate relic of blood, which had been taken from Pope John Paul II in 1981. T the relic was eventually retrieved having been thrown into reeds next to a nearby railway station.

Meanwhile, more than 50 Carabinieri, the national military police of Italy, are involved in a manhunt along with sniffer dogs around the church of St Peter of the Ienca, near Aquila, in the mountainous Abruzzo region, while according to the Osservatorio Antiplagio“a watchdog on media scams” – the vial theft could be related to Satanism.

The  blood was stolen (they claim) on the day “that corresponds to the dominium of the demon Volac”,  and  “Another factor is International Holocaust Remembrance Day, which prompts satanic rituals in preparation for the Satan’s birthday on 1 February,”

Volac – also Ualac, Valak, Valax, Valu, Valic, Valac – for those who have been neglecting their demonology, is the mighty Great President of Hell, having thirty ( some say thirty-eight) legions of demons under his command.

 He is said to give true answers about hidden treasures; he reveals where serpents can be seen, and delivers them harmless to the magician. He can lead one toward a good job, a sympathetic friend. He also provides lucky numbers.

He is said to appear as a small poor boy with angel wings riding on a two-headed dragon. He moves fast,  flies very fast and usually departs through the ceiling.

More Volac trivia –

    Volac is a Night Demon
    Zodiac Position: 5-9 degrees of Aquarius
    January 25th-29th
    Tarot Card: 5 of Swords
    Planet: Saturn/Uranus
    Candle Color: White
    Plant: Sesame
    Metal: Lead/Uranium
    Element: Air
    Rank: President

Never heard of Satan ever having a birthday… as an angel, wasn’t he created basically from kit form, not born ?  February 1st – well, February 2nd is Candlemas (or Imbolc to the celts) but has no Satanic connections I can ever recall hearing of.

Candlemas / Imbolc is accociated with the goddess Brighid (aka Bride), and it’s interesting to note that an old Scots gaelic rhyme for February 2nd has it that –

Moch maduinn Bhride,
Thig an nimhir as an toll;
Cha bhoin mise ris an nimhir,
Cha bhoin an nimhir rium.

or, in English –

Early on Bride’s morn,
the serpent will come from the hollow
I will not molest the serpent,
nor will the serpent molest me

Which kind of brings us back to Volac, who “reveals where serpents can be seen, and delivers them harmless to the magician”. No doubt pure coincidence, but an interesting one.

What any of this has to do with someone pinching a dead pope’s blood is anybodies guess….

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Almanac – May 19

1536 – Anne Boleyn, second wife of Henry VIII of England, was beheaded for alledged adultery, treason, and incest.

Following the coronation of her daughter, Elizabeth, as queen, Anne was venerated as a martyr and heroine of the English Reformation, particularly through the works of John Foxe.

Over the centuries, she has inspired or been mentioned in numerous artistic and cultural works, as a result, she has retained her hold on the popular imagination.

Anne has been called “the most influential and important queen consort England has ever had”, since she provided the occasion for Henry VIII to annul his marriage to Catherine of Aragon, and declare his independence from Rome.

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1649 – An Act of Parliament declaring England a Commonwealth was passed by the Long Parliament.

England would be a republic for the next eleven years.

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1925 – Malcolm X born. American Muslim minister and human rights activist.

To his admirers, he was a courageous advocate for the rights of blacks, a man who indicted white America in the harshest terms for its crimes against black Americans. Detractors accused him of preaching racism, black supremacy, and violence.

He has been called one of the greatest and most influential African Americans in history.

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Almanac – April 21

753 BC – Romulus and Remus founded Rome, according to legend.

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571 – Prophet Muhammad  born in Makkah.

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1918 –  German fighter ace Manfred von Richthofen, known as “The Red Baron”, was shot down and killed over Vaux-sur-Somme in France.

He was considered the top ace of  WWI, being officially credited with 80 air combat victories.

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1934 – The “Surgeon’s Photograph”, the most famous photo allegedly showing the Loch Ness Monster, was published in the Daily Mail, supposedly taken by Robert Kenneth Wilson, a London gynaecologist.

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1970 – The Hutt River Province Principality seceded from Australia.

The oldest micronation in Australia, the principality claims to be an independent sovereign state having achieved legal status on 21 April 1972, although it remains unrecognised except by other micronations.

The principality is located 517 km (354 mi) north of Perth, near the town of Northampton. If considered independent, it is an enclave of Australia.

The principality was founded Leonard George Casley when he and his associates proclaimed their secession from the state of Western Australia.

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2003 – Nina Simone died. American singer, songwriter, pianist, arranger, and civil rights activist widely associated with jazz music.

Simone aspired to become a classical pianist while working in a broad range of styles including classical, jazz, blues, folk, R&B, gospel, and pop.

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Almanac – March 20

235 – Maximinus Thrax  proclaimed Roman emperor.  Most likely  of Thraco-Roman origin, and  the first emperor never to set foot in Rome.
But really he’s here because I love his name…

MAXIMINUS THRAX ! Say it loud and say it proud…

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1915 – Sister Rosetta Tharpe born.  American singer, songwriter, guitarist and recording artist.

A pioneer of 20th-century music, Tharpe attained great popularity in the 1930s and 1940s with her gospel recordings that were a mixture of spiritual lyrics and early rock and roll accompaniment.

 As the first recording artist to impact the music charts with spiritual recordings, she effectively became the first superstar of gospel music and known as “the original soul sister”.

She was an early influence on iconic figures such as Elvis Presley, Jerry Lee Lewis, Little Richard and Johnny Cash.

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1936 – Lee “Scratch” Perry born. Jamaican reggae producer noted for his innovative studio techniques and production values.

Perry was one of the pioneers in the development of dub music with his early adoption of effects and remixing to create new instrumental or vocal versions of existing reggae tracks.

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1943 – Gerard Malanga born. American poet, photographer, filmmaker, curator and archivist.

He  worked closely with Andy Warhol during that artist’s most creative period, from 1963 to 1970. A February 17, 1992 article in The New York Times referred to him as “Andy Warhol’s most important associate.

Malanga was involved in all phases of Warhol’s creative output in silkscreen painting and filmmaking. He acted in many of the early Warhol films, including Vinyl, Chelsea Girls, and Kiss; and co-produced Bufferin (1967) in which he reads his poetry, deemed to be the longest spoken word movie on record at 33-minutes nonstop.

 In 1966, he choreographed the music of the Velvet Underground for Warhol’s multimedia presentation, The Exploding Plastic Inevitable.

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Almanac – February 17

1600 –  Giordano Bruno  burned alive, for heresy, at Campo de’ Fiori in Rome.

Italian Dominican friar, philosopher, mathematician and astronomer. His cosmological theories went beyond the Copernican model in proposing that the Sun was essentially a star, and moreover, that the universe contained an infinite number of inhabited worlds populated by other intelligent beings.

The free-thinking Roman Catholic church naturally embraced such views with the  same sort of enthusiasm that they now reserve for condoms, and, after the  Roman Inquisition  found him guilty of heresey,  he was burnt at the stake.

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1864 – Banjo Paterson born. Australian bush poet, journalist and author, he wrote many ballads and poems about Australian life, focusing particularly on the rural and outback areas, including the district around Binalong, New South Wales, where he spent much of his childhood.

Paterson’s more notable poems include “Waltzing Matilda”, “The Man from Snowy River” and “Clancy of the Overflow”.

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1909 – Geronimo died. Prominent leader of the Bedonkohe Apache who fought against Mexico and the United States for their expansion into Apache tribal lands for several decades during the Apache Wars.

“Geronimo” was the name given to him during a battle with Mexican soldiers. His Chiricahua name is often rendered as Goyathlay or Goyahkla in English.

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1982 – Thelonious Monk died. American jazz pianist and composer considered one of the giants of American music.

Monk had a unique improvisational style and made numerous contributions to the standard jazz repertoire, including “Epistrophy”, “‘Round Midnight”, “Blue Monk”, “Straight, No Chaser” and “Well, You Needn’t”.

Monk is the second-most recorded jazz composer after Duke Ellington, which is particularly remarkable as Ellington composed over 1,000 songs while Monk wrote about 70.

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Almanac – October 15

1764 – Edward Gibbon observed a group of friars singing in the ruined Temple of Jupiter in Rome, which inspired him to begin work on The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire.

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1844 – Friedrich Nietzsche born.  German philosopher, poet, composer, cultural critic, and classical philologist. He appears in the following video – can you spot him ?

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1881 – P. G. Wodehouse born. English humorist, whose body of work includes novels, short stories, plays, poems, song lyrics, and numerous pieces of journalism. He enjoyed enormous popular success during a career that lasted more than seventy years and his many writings continue to be widely read.

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1888 – The “From Hell” letter sent to investigators of the Jack the Ripper murders. Postmarked on 15 October 1888, the letter was received by George Lusk, then head of the Whitechapel Vigilance Committee, the following day.Though hundreds of letters claiming to be from the killer were posted at the time of the Ripper murders, many researchers argue that the “From Hell” letter is one of a handful of possibly authentic writings received from the murderer.

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1917 – Mata Hari died. Margaretha Geertruida “Margreet” Zelle, better known by the stage name Mata Hari, was a Dutch exotic dancer, courtesan, and accused spy who was executed by firing squad in France under charges of espionage for Germany during World War I. It’s quite possible that she was used as a scapegoat by the French military authority to obscure the failing of the French military operations at the front.

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1938 – Fela Kuti born. Nigerian multi-instrumentalist musician and composer, pioneer of Afrobeat music, human rights activist, and political maverick.

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1965 – The Catholic Worker Movement staged an anti-Vietnam War rally in Manhattan including a public burning of a draft card; the first such act to result in arrest under a new amendment to the Selective Service Act.

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1966 – Black Panther Party was created by Huey P. Newton and Bobby Seale.

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Almanac – July 19th

64 – Great Fire of Rome:  a fire began  to burn in the merchant area of Rome and was soon  completely out of control. According to a popular, but untrue legend, Nero fiddled as the city burned.

1553 – Lady Jane Grey was replaced by Mary I of England as Queen of England after only nine days of reign.

1860 – Lizzie  Borden born.  She was tried for killing her father and stepmother with an axe on August 4, 1892, in Fall River, Massachusetts, USA.

The murders, subsequent trial, and ensuing trial by media became a cause célèbre. Although she  was acquitted, no one else was ever arrested or tried and she has remained a notorious figure in American folklore. Dispute over the identity of the killer or killers continues to this day.

According to a popular rhyme of the time –

Lizzie Borden took an axe
And gave her mother forty whacks.
When she saw what she had done
 She gave her father forty-one.

Actually, whoever did the deed gave her (step-)mother 18 or 19   whacks and her father 11.

1919 – Following Peace Day celebrations marking the end of World War I, ex-servicemen,  unhappy with unemployment and other grievances, rioted  and burnt down Luton Town Hall.  
The riot started after members of the council arrived to read out the King’s proclamation and many in the crowd expressed their disapproval. Tension boiled over into violence and a number of protesters broke through the police line and forcibly entered the town hall. Shortly after a number of violent clashes took place, with the town hall being stormed by the crowd and eventually set on fire.

During the riot people broke into Farmers Music Shop and dragged pianos into the streets for dancing and singing, including ironically “Keep the home fires burning”. The mayor at the time, Henry Impey,  was smuggled out of Luton, never to return.

1979 – The Sandinista rebels overthrew the government of the Somoza family in Nicaragua.

Mr. Frankenstein

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