Tag Archives: Rolling Stones

Almanac – February 16

2004 – Doris Troy died.  American R&B singer, known to her many fans as “Mama Soul”.

She  worked with Solomon Burke, The Drifters, Cissy Houston, and Dionne Warwick, before she co-wrote and recorded “Just One Look”, which hit #10 in the US Billboard Hot 100 in 1963.  Her only foray into the UK Singles Chart, “Whatcha Gonna Do About It“, peaked at #37 in December 1964.

As her solo career peaked, she sang back-up for the Rolling Stones, Humble Pie, Kevin Ayers, Pink Floyd (on their album The Dark Side of the Moon),  George Harrison, Johnny Hallyday, Vivian Stanshall, Dusty Springfield,Nick Drake, Junior Campbell and Carly Simon.

She was signed by The Beatles to their Apple Records label in 1969, and released the Doris Troy album the following year, co-produced  with  George Harrison.

She died from emphysema at her home in Las Vegas, Nevada, aged 67

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Almanac – December 17

1833 – Kaspar Hauser died. German youth who claimed to have grown up in the total isolation of a darkened cell. Hauser’s claims, and his subsequent death by stabbing, sparked much debate and controversy.

On 26 May 1828, a teenage boy appeared in the streets of Nuremberg, Germany. He carried a letter with him addressed to the captain of the 4th squadron of the 6th cavalry regiment, Captain von Wessenig. Its heading read: Von der Bäierischen Gränz / daß Orte ist unbenant / 1828 (“From the Bavarian border / The place is unnamed [sic] / 1828”).

The anonymous author said that the boy was given into his custody as an infant on 7 October 1812 and that he instructed him in reading, writing and the Christian religion, but never let him “take a single step out of my house”. The letter stated that the boy would now like to be a cavalryman “as his father was” and invited the captain either to take him in or to hang him.

There was another short letter enclosed purporting to be from his mother to his prior caretaker. It stated that his name was Kaspar, that he was born on 30 April 1812 and that his father, a cavalryman of the 6th regiment, was dead. In fact this letter was found to have been written by the same hand as the other one (whose line “he writes my handwriting exactly as I do” led later analysts to assume that Kaspar himself wrote both of them

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1938 – Carlo Little born.  Rock and roll drummer, based in the London nightclub scene in the 1960s. He played in an early version of The Rolling Stones, and  was also with Cyril Davies’ All Stars and was a founding member of Screaming Lord Sutch’s Savages.

He is credited with giving Keith Moon his sound and style. Little was the loudest drummer many had ever seen or heard, one of the first to ever hammer the bass drum. After a Savages show Moon begged Little to give him lessons, initially Carlo said no but reconsidered after thinking he could use the extra money.

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1969 – The United States Air Force closesd its study of UFOs – Project Blue Book, which had started in 1952.
It had two goals:

– to determine if UFOs were a threat to national security, and
– to scientifically analyze UFO-related data.

By the time Project Blue Book ended, it had collected 12,618 UFO reports, and concluded that most of them were misidentifications of natural phenomena (clouds, stars, etc.) or conventional aircraft. According to the National Reconnaissance Office a number of the reports could be explained by flights of the formerly secret reconnaissance planes U-2 and A-12. A small percentage of UFO reports were classified as unexplained, even after stringent analysis.

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2010 – Captain Beefheart died. Don Van Vliet, American musician, singer-songwriter, artist and poet widely known by the stage name Captain Beefheart. His music blended rock, blues and psychedelia with avant-garde and contemporary experimental composition.

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Almanac – December 06

1877 – Thomas Edison, using his new phonograph, made one of the earliest recordings of a human voice, reciting “Mary Had a Little Lamb”.

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1890 – Dion Fortune born.   British occultist and author. Her pseudonym (she was born Violet Mary Firth Evans) was inspired by her family motto “Deo, non-fortuna” ( “by God, not fate”).

Of her works on magical subjects, the best remembered of her books are; The Cosmic Doctrine, a summation of her basic teachings on mysticism, Psychic Self-Defense,  a manual on how to protect oneself from psychic attacks and The Mystical Qabalah,  an introduction to Hermetic Qabalah which was first published in England in 1935, and is regarded by many occultists as one of the best books on magic ever written. Though some of her writings may seem dated to contemporary readers, they have the virtue of lucidity and avoid the deliberate obscurity that characterised many of her forerunners and contemporaries.

She also  wrote about the “Magical Battle of Britain”,[ which was a purported attempt by British occultists to magically aid the war effort during World War II. Her efforts in regard to this are recorded in a series of letters she wrote at the time. The effort involved is said by some  to have contributed to her death shortly after the war ended.

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1933 – U.S. federal judge John M. Woolsey ruled that the James Joyce‘s novel Ulysses is not obscene.

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1949 – Leadbelly died. Huddie William Ledbetter, American folk and blues musician, and multi-instrumentalist, notable for his strong vocals, his virtuosity on the twelve-string guitar, and the songbook of folk standards he introduced.

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1969 – Meredith Hunter  killed by the Hells Angels during  Rolling Stones‘s concert at the Altamont Speedway in California.  During the performance by , he  was punched by Hells Angels  serving as security guards. He subsequently drew a gun, and was stabbed to death by Hells Angel Alan Passaro.

Some claim it happened while the Stones were playing Sympathy For The Devil,  thus giving it an extra frisson, but it was actually while they were performing Under My Thumb.

Many commentators have seen this event  as the symbolic end of the Hippie dream, such as it was.

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Almanac – November 24

1859 – Charles Darwin published On the Origin of Species.

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1868 – Scott Joplin born. American composer and pianist. Joplin achieved fame for his ragtime compositions, and was later dubbed “The King of Ragtime”. During his brief career, he wrote 44 original ragtime pieces, one ragtime ballet, and two operas. One of his first pieces, the “Maple Leaf Rag”, became ragtime’s first and most influential hit, and has been recognized as the archetypal rag.

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1941 – Donald “Duck” Dunn born.  American bass guitarist, session musician, record producer, and songwriter. Dunn was notable for his 1960s recordings with Booker T. & the M.G.’s and as a session bassist for Stax Records, playing on thousands of records including hits by Otis Redding, Sam & Dave, Rufus Thomas, Carla Thomas, William Bell, Eddie Floyd, Johnnie Taylor, Albert King, and many others.

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1944 – Candy Darling born. American actress, best known as a Warhol Superstar.  A male-to-female transsexual, she starred in Andy Warhol’s films Flesh (1968) and Women in Revolt (1971), and was also immortalized in the Velvet Underground‘s  ‘Candy Says’, Lou Reed‘s ‘Walk On the Wild Side’, the Rolling Stones song ‘Citadel’, and some claim she was the inspiration for  The Kinks ‘Lola’.

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1947 – For refusing to co-operate with the House Un-American Activities Committee, the US Congress cited 10 Hollywood Writers, directors and producers – the Hollywood 10 – for contempt.

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1963 – Lee Harvey Oswald, accused of assassinating John F. Kennedy, was himself murdered by Jack Ruby.

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1985 – Big Joe Turner died.  American blues shouter from Kansas City, Missouri. According to the songwriter Doc Pomus, “Rock and roll would have never happened without him.”  Although  his greatest fame came  in the 1950s with his pioneering rock and roll recordings, particularly “Shake, Rattle and Roll”, Turner’s career as a performer stretched from the 1920s into the 1980s

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Almanac – July 12th

1789 – French revolutionary and radical journalist Camille Desmoulins gave a speech in response to the dismissal of Jacques Necker,  France’s finance minister, the day before. The speech called the citizens to arms and led to the Storming of the Bastille two days later.

1880 – Birth of  Tod Browning, American film director responisble for the cult classic Freaks and one of the most sought after lost films – and early example of the vampire genre –  London After Midnight.

1947 – Birth of Loren Coleman, American cryptozoologist and author.

1948 – Israeli Prime Minister David Ben-Gurion ordered the explusion of Palestinians from the towns of Lod and Ramla.

1962 – The Rolling Stones live debut, at the Marquee Club, London.

1971 – The Australian Aboriginal flag was flown for the first time. The  flag represents Indigenous Australians and was designed in 1971 by Aboriginal artist Harold Thomas, who is descended from the Luritja people of Central Australia.  The flag was originally designed for the land rights movement, and it became a symbol of the Aboriginal people, and it looks like this –

 

 

1973 –  Death of Lon Chaney, Jr., American actor.

 

Mr. Frankenstein

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Almanac – July 3rd

The start of the Dog Days, when Sirius, the Dog Star, is in the ascendent [continues until around August 11th].

Supposed to be the hottest, most sultry days of summer. In the Northern Hemisphere, the dog days of summer are most commonly experienced in the months of July and August, which typically observe the warmest summer temperatures.

In the Southern Hemisphere, they typically occur in January and February, in the midst of the austral summer. The name comes from the ancient belief that Sirius in close proximity to the Sun was responsible for the hot weather.

Other dates are sometimes given for the Dog Days.

1883Franz Kafka born.

1940 Fontella Bass, American soul singer, born.

 

1969 – Former Rolling Stones guitarist Brian Jones died.

1971Jim Morrison died.

2009 –  Death of John A. Keel, American fortean, television scriptwriter, author of The Mothman Prophecies.

Mr. Frankenstein

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