Tag Archives: Rod Serling

Almanac – December 25

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A happy Midwinter festival (Midsummer in the southern hemisphere) of your choice to all our readers.

The Robin in the picture is the one that’s hanging around my garden this winter.  They’re generally pretty inquisitive birds, but this one is positively fearless.

 

This  Christmas song is made up of bits of all the other Christmas songs – truly the soundtrack for Xmas In Hell !

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1066 – William the Conqueror  crowned king of England, at Westminster Abbey, London.

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1137 – Saladin born. Salāh ad-Dīn Yūsuf ibn Ayyūb,  Kurdish Muslim, who became the first Sultan of Egypt and Syria, and founded the Ayyubid dynasty. He led Muslim opposition to the Franks and other European Crusaders in the Levant. At the height of his power, his sultanate included Egypt, Syria, Mesopotamia, Hejaz, Yemen, and parts of North Africa.

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1924 – Rod Serling born.  American screenwriter, novelist, television producer, and narrator best known for his live television dramas of the 1950s and his science fiction anthology TV series, The Twilight Zone. Serling was active in politics, both on and off the screen and helped form television industry standards. He was known as the “angry young man” of Hollywood, clashing with television executives and sponsors over a wide range of issues including censorship, racism, and war.

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1925 – Carlos Castaneda born. Peruvian author and student of anthropology. Starting with The Teachings of Don Juan in 1968, Castaneda wrote a series of books that describe his alleged training in shamanism.

The books, narrated in the first person, relate his supposed experiences under the tutelage of a Yaqui “Man of Knowledge” named Don Juan Matus. Critics have suggested that they are works of fiction; supporters claim the books are either true or at least valuable works of philosophy and descriptions of practices which enable an increased awareness.

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1950 – The Stone of Scone, traditional coronation stone of British monarchs, was taken from Westminster Abbey by Scottish nationalist students. ( It later turned up in Scotland on April 11, 1951.)

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2008 – Eartha Kitt died. American singer, actress, and cabaret star.  Orson Welles once called her the “most exciting woman in the world.”

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Almanac – June 28th

1712 – Birth of Jean-Jaques Rousseau.

1846 – The saxophone was patented by Adolphe Sax in Paris.

1880 – The Australian bushranger Ned Kelly  captured at Glenrowan.

1905 – A French criminal named Languille was  guillotined. At the very moment his severed head tumbled forward from the blade, a Dr. Beaurieux observed movement in its eyelids and lips. Three times he called out Languille’s name in a loud voice. The first two times the eyes opened and focused on him. The third time, no reaction.

1914Archduke Franz Ferdinand assassinated in Sarajevo, setting in motion the events that led to World War I.

1924Arthur Ferguson suceeded in selling London’s Trafalgar Square to an American tourist for 6000 GBP. He later “sold” Big Ben and Buckingham Palace, before emigrating to the USA, where he was arrested trying to sell the Statue of Liberty.

1964Malcolm X forms the Organization of Afro-American Unity.

1969 Stonewall Riots begin in New York City marking the start of the Gay Rights Movement.

1975 – Death of  Rod Serling, American TV screenwriter, novelist, television producer, and narrator best known for his live television dramas of the 1950s and his science fiction anthology TV series, The Twilight Zone.

1993 –  Death of GG Allin, American singer, who I used to correspond with in the early 1980s.

 

 

Mr. Frankenstein

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