Tag Archives: psychologist

Grandmother swears like a trooper after stroke changes her personality

Prim pensioner Pat Preston swears like a trooper for the first time in her life after waking from a stroke with a changed personality.

Grandmother Pat, 65, has shocked her husband, Michael by turning the air blue with a stream four-letter words in front of her doctor; has sworn in the presence of friends; and has been known to call her grandchildren “little b****s” since suffering a stroke in January.

It is a complete departure from the type of language the retired bank customer service advisor would have used in the past and she even has a ‘swear box’ she adds money to after using inappropriate words.

Pat, of Whickham, Gateshead, said:

“Before I had a stroke I would still get annoyed at things but I could control my upset, however now I just can’t help it. I can swear during conversations and a couple of weeks ago my grandchildren were playing up and I called them ‘little b*****s’.

“My husband gets annoyed because he’s a retired headteacher and gets horrified sometimes at what I say. I can get a little nervous too about what language I might use.

“If something really annoys me I am not able to keep my thoughts to myself and I’m quite outspoken. If I go into a shop and don’t like how the assistants are reacting to me or even someone else I will say so.

“I was not aware that a stroke could affect someone in this way and change their personality. My close family and friends still can’t quite accept that I’ve had a stroke.”

Pat, who also has the condition Lupus, had just enjoyed a weekend of birthday celebrations in January and was in the MetroCentre when she began to feel unwell with a headache, sweating and feeling faint as she got new glasses fitted.

She immediately called her husband but she could not get her words out and it was clear that all was not right. Yet it was not until she got home and was unable to move her legs to get out the car that the emergency services were called.

Pat was taken to Gateshead’s Queen Elizabeth Hospital where she was assessed and treated by specialists. She remained in the combined stroke unit for more than six weeks and now requires the assistance of walking aids to get around, and her home has been adapted to her needs.

I would be telling lies if I said that there is not a time each day that I don’t think about what happened and the impact it’s had on my life,” explained Pat.

But I have to accept what has happened and move forward the best that I can as you only get one life. I am about 75% back to what I was like before the stroke. I feel very lucky that I can carry on with my life as I am and you have got to see the funny side of things or it would get you down.”

Pat is receiving help from psychologists to come to terms with the changes in her life and has been able to regain movement to her affected left side thanks to working with occupational therapists.

Specialist stroke nurse Marie Twentyman, who works at Queen Elizabeth Hospital, said:

Patients can have a change of personality following a stroke. Sometimes words get mixed up in the brain and vocabulary that would not normally be used by a patients is.

“Stroke affects everyone differently. When Pat was on the ward you could see that she would become frustrated as she had been so independent before, and it was when she became tired and frustrated that she would use language that she would not normally have used.

“It is very important that if anyone is suspected to have suffered a stroke that they seek medical treatment quickly so that treatment can be given as soon as possible.”

Source – Newcastle Journal,  23 Sept 2014

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Almanac – May 31

1837 – Joseph Grimaldi died.  English actor, comedian and dancer, who became the most popular English entertainer of the Regency era.

In the early 1800s, he expanded the role of Clown in the harlequinade that formed part of British pantomimes, notably at the Theatre Royal, Drury Lane and the Sadler’s Wells and Covent Garden theatres, and  became so dominant on the London comic stage that harlequinade Clowns became known as “Joey”, and both the nickname and Grimaldi’s whiteface make-up design were, and still are, used by other types of clowns. He also originated catchphrases such as “Here we are again!”, which continues to feature in modern pantomimes.
In his last years, Grimaldi lived in relative obscurity and became a depressed, impoverished alcoholic, dying at home in Islington in 1837, aged 59.

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1872 – W. Heath Robinson born.  English cartoonist and illustrator, best known for drawings of eccentric machines.

In the UK, the term “Heath Robinson” has entered the language as a description of any unnecessarily complex and implausible contraption, although it  is perhaps more often used in relation to temporary fixes using ingenuity and whatever is to hand, often string and tape, or unlikely cannibalisations.

Its popularity is undoubtedly linked to Second World War Britain’s shortages and the need to “make do and mend“.

 

 

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1996 – Timothy Leary died. American psychologist and writer, known for his advocacy of psychedelic drugs.

During a time when drugs such as LSD and psilocybin were legal, Leary conducted experiments at Harvard University under the Harvard Psilocybin Project, resulting in the Concord Prison Experiment and the Marsh Chapel Experiment.

Both studies produced useful data, but Leary and his associate Richard Alpert were fired from the university nonetheless because of the public controversy surrounding their research.

Leary believed LSD showed therapeutic potential for use in psychiatry. He popularized catchphrases that promoted his philosophy such as “turn on, tune in, drop out” (a phrase given to Leary by Marshall McLuhan); “set and setting“; and “think for yourself and question authority“.

He also wrote and spoke frequently about transhumanist concepts involving space migration, intelligence increase and life extension (SMI²LE), and developed the eight-circuit model of consciousness in his book Exo-Psychology (1977).

During the 1960s and 1970s, he was arrested often enough to see the inside of 29 different prisons worldwide. President Richard Nixon once described Leary as “the most dangerous man in America“.
His death was videotaped for posterity at his request, capturing his final words. During his final moments, he said, “Why not?” to his son Zachary. He uttered the phrase repeatedly, in different intonations, and died soon after. His last word, according to Zach, was “beautiful.”
Seven grams of Leary’s ashes were arranged  to be buried in space aboard a rocket carrying the remains of 24 others including Gene Roddenberry (creator of Star Trek), Gerard O’Neill (space physicist), and Krafft Ehricke (rocket scientist). A Pegasus rocket containing their remains was launched on April 21, 1997, and remained in orbit for six years until it burned up in the atmosphere.

 

 

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Almanac – May 13

1895 – Nandor Fodor born. Hungarian parapsychologist, psychologist, author and journalist.

Fodor was one of the leading authorities on poltergeists, haunting and all kinds of paranormal phenomena usually associated with mediumship.

A one time associate of  Sigmund Freud, he  wrote on subjects like prenatal development and dream interpretation, but is credited mostly for his magnum opus, Encyclopedia of Psychic Science, first published in 1934. Among the subjects he closely studied was the case of Gef the talking mongoose.

Fodor took a psychoanalytic approach to supernatural phenomena, and  pioneered the theory that poltergeists are external manifestations of conflicts within the subconscious mind rather than autonomous entities with minds of their own.

He also studied dream telepathy and came to the conclusion that some kind of communication could take place between people with close emotional ties.

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1917 – Three children – Lúcia Santos and her cousins Jacinta and Francisco Marto –   reported the first apparition of Our Lady of Fátima in Fátima, Portugal.

The events at Fátima gained particular fame due to their elements of prophecy and eschatology, particularly with regard to possible world war and the conversion of Soviet Russia.

The apparitions  were officially declared “worthy of belief” by the Catholic Church.

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Almanac – January 18

1873 – Edward George Bulwer-Lytton died. English politician, poet, playwright, and novelist. He was immensely popular with the reading public and wrote a stream of bestselling novels which earned him a considerable fortune.

He coined the phrases “the great unwashed”,pursuit of the almighty dollar“, “the pen is mightier than the sword“, as well as the famous opening line “It was a dark and stormy night“.

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1932 – Robert Anton Wilson born. American author and polymath who became at various times a novelist, philosopher, psychologist, essayist, editor, playwright, poet, futurist, civil libertarian and self-described agnostic mystic.

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