Tag Archives: Prince of Wales

Almanac – May 04

1471 –  The Battle of Tewkesbury: Edward IV defeated a Lancastrian Army and killed Edward, Prince of Wales.

I mention this here merely because I once took part in a re-enactment of this battle… (dont ask).
 
I was part of Edward IV’s victorious Yorkist army, though due to lack of enacters I was killed twice, returning to life each time to make up numbers. My life as a medieval zombie soldier…

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1852 – Alice Liddell born. Original of Alice In Wonderland.

In  July 1862, in a rowing boat travelling on the Isis from Folly Bridge, Oxford to Godstow for a picnic outing, 10-year-old Alice asked Charles Dodgson (who wrote under the pen name Lewis Carroll) to entertain her and her sisters, Edith (aged 8) and Lorina (13), with a story.

Dodgson duly  regaled the girls with fantastic stories of a girl, named Alice, and her adventures after she fell into a rabbit-hole.

The story was not unlike those Dodgson had spun for the sisters before, but this time Liddell asked  Dodgson to write it down for her. He promised to do so but did not get around to the task for some months.

He eventually presented her with the manuscript of Alice’s Adventures Under Ground in November 1864.

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1961 –  The Freedom Riders began a bus trip through the American  South.

Freedom Riders were civil rights activists who rode interstate buses into the segregated southern United States in 1961 and following years to challenge the non-enforcement of the United States Supreme Court decisions Irene Morgan v. Commonwealth of Virginia (1946) and Boynton v. Virginia (1960), which ruled that segregated public buses were unconstitutional.

 The Southern states had ignored the rulings and the federal government did nothing to enforce them. The first Freedom Ride left Washington, D.C., on May 4, 1961, and was scheduled to arrive in New Orleans on May 17.

The Freedom Riders challenged the status quo by riding interstate buses in the South in mixed racial groups to challenge local laws or customs that enforced segregation in seating.

The Freedom Rides, and the violent reactions they provoked, bolstered the credibility of the American Civil Rights Movement and  called national attention to the disregard for the federal law and the local violence used to enforce segregation in the southern United States.

Police arrested riders for trespassing, unlawful assembly, and violating state and local Jim Crow laws, along with other alleged offenses, but they often first let white mobs attack them without intervention.

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1970 –  Kent State shootings: the Ohio National Guard, sent to Kent State University after disturbances in the city of Kent the weekend before, opened fire killing four unarmed students and wounding nine others. The students were protesting the United States’ invasion of Cambodia.

There was a significant national response to the shootings: hundreds of universities, colleges, and high schools closed throughout the United States due to a student strike of four million students, and the event further affected the public opinion—at an already socially contentious time—over the role of the United States in the Vietnam War.

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Almanac – February 12

1554 – A year after claiming the throne of England for nine days, Lady Jane Grey was beheaded for treason, aged 16 or 17.

She was an English noblewoman and de facto monarch of England from 10 July until 19 July 1553.

During her short reign, Jane resided in the Tower of London. She became a prisoner there when the Privy Council decided to change sides and proclaim Mary as Queen on 19 July.

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1870 – Marie Lloyd born. English music hall singer, comedienne and musical theatre actress during the late Victorian era. She was perhaps best known for her many songs based on everyday subjects for working-class women, including “The Boy I Love Is Up in the Gallery”, her first major success, “My Old Man (Said Follow the Van)” and “Oh Mr Porter What Shall I Do”.

She received much criticism for her use of innuendo and double entendre during her performances, but enjoyed a long and prosperous career and was affectionately called the “Queen of the Music Hall” by her audiences.

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1929 – Lillie Langtry died.  British music hall singer and stage actress famous for her many stage productions including She Stoops to Conquer, The Lady of Lyons and As You Like It.

She was also known for her relationships with nobility, including the Prince of Wales, the Earl of Shrewsbury and Prince Louis of Battenberg.

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1984 – Death of Anna Anderson . She claimed to be the Grand Duchess Anastasia, daughter of the last Tsar of Russia, believed executed by Bolshevik soldiers on the night of July 16 / 17 1918.

Anderson’s body was cremated upon her death ,  but DNA testing in 1994 on available pieces of Anderson’s tissue and hair showed no relation to the DNA of the Imperial family

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2000 – Screamin’ Jay Hawkins died.  American musician, singer, and actor. Famed chiefly for his powerful, operatic vocal delivery and wildly theatrical performances of songs such as “I Put a Spell on You”, Hawkins oftn used macabre props onstage, making him one of the few early shock rockers.

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Almanac – September 16

1400 – A meeting of Welsh rebels at Glyndyfrdwy, Merionithshire, declared Owain Glyndwr to be the rightful Prince of Wales, sparking a 10-year rebellion gainst Henry IV.

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1498 – Tomas de Torquemada, monk and first Inquisitor-General of Spain, died.  Notorious for his zealous campaign against the crypto-Jews and crypto-Muslims of Spain, he was one of the chief supporters of the Alhambra Decree, which expelled the Jews from Spain in 1492. About 2,000 people were burned at the stake by the Spanish Inquisition between 1480 and 1530. In modern times, his name has become synonymous with the Christian Inquisition’s horror, religious bigotry, and cruel fanaticism.  In 1832, his tomb was ransacked, his bones stolen and burnt to ashes.

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1886 – Hans Arp born., German-French sculptor, painter, poet and abstract artist in other media such as torn and pasted paper, Arp was a founding member of the Dada movement in Zürich in 1916.

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1925 – B.B. King born. American songwriter, vocalist, and  blues guitarist.Rolling Stone magazine ranked him at No. 6 on its list of the 100 greatest guitarists of all time.

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1934 – Dick Heckstall-Smith born.  English jazz and blues saxophonist. He played with some of the most influential English blues rock and jazz fusion bands of the 1960s and 1970s, including Blues Incorporated, The Graham Bond Organization, John Mayall’s Bluesbreakers and Colosseum.

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1977 – Marc Bolan died. English singer-songwriter, guitarist and poet,  best known as the frontman of  T. Rex. Died in a car smash.

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