Tag Archives: Nancy Sinatra

Almanac – April 05

1906 – Lord Buckley born. American stage performer, recording artist, monologist, and hip poet/comic. Buckley’s unique stage persona never found more than a cult audience during his life, but anticipated aspects of the Beat Generation sensibility, and influenced figures as various as Bob Dylan, Ken Kesey, George Harrison, Tom Waits, Dizzy Gillespie and Jimmy Buffett.

.

.

 1926 – Roger Corman born. American film producer, director and actor. Working mainly  on low-budget B movies, some of Corman’s work has an established critical reputation, such as his cycle of films adapted from the tales of Edgar Allan Poe,and in 2009 he won an Honorary Academy Award for his body of work.

In 1966, Corman made the first biker movie with The Wild Angels, starring Peter Fonda and Nancy Sinatra, and in  1967, The Trip, written by Jack Nicholson and starring Peter Fonda, began the psychedelic film craze of the late 1960s.

.

.

1929 – Joe Meek born. Pioneering English record producer and songwriter. Despite not being able to play a musical instrument or write notation, Meek displayed a remarkable facility for writing and producing successful commercial recordings.

In writing songs he was reliant on musicians such as Dave Adams, Geoff Goddard or Charles Blackwell to transcribe melodies from his vocal “demos”. He worked on 245 singles, of which 45 were major hits (top fifty).

He pioneered studio tools such as multiple over-dubbing on one- and two-track machines, close miking, direct input of bass guitars, the compressor, and effects like echo and reverb, as well as sampling.

Unlike other producers, his search was for the ‘right‘ sound rather than for a catchy musical tune, and throughout his brief career he single-mindedly followed his quest to create a unique “sonic signature” for every record he produced.

.

.

1997 – Allen Ginsberg died.  American poet and one of the leading figures of the Beat Generation in the 1950s.

He vigorously opposed militarism, economic materialism and sexual repression, and is best known for his epic poem “Howl“, in which he celebrated his fellow “angel-headed hipsters” and harshly denounced what he saw as the destructive forces of capitalism and conformity in the United States.

I saw the best minds of my generation destroyed by
madness, starving hysterical naked,
dragging themselves through the negro streets at dawn
looking for an angry fix…

.

 

 

.

 

 

A&A forum banner

Leave a comment

Filed under Almanac

Almanac – August 4

1577 – A supernatural Black Dog disrupted a service at the church of the Holy Trinity, in Blythburgh, Suffolk.

“A strange and terrible tempest” struck the building and toppled the spire through the roof, where it shattered the font. Three people were killed and others badly scorched. Claw marks were subsequently discovered on the church door.

The entity then went on to Bungay church, where it left two worshippers “strangled at their prayers” and a third “as shrunken as a piece of leather scorched in a fire.”

 

 

1693 – Date traditionally ascribed, erroneously,  to Dom Perignon‘s invention of Champagne.  He was a French Benedictine monk who made important contributions to the production and quality of Champagne wine in an era when the region’s wines were predominantly still and red. Popular myths frequently  credit him with the invention of sparkling Champagne, which however  didn’t become the dominant style of Champagne until mid-19th century.

The famous champagne Dom Pérignon, the préstige cuvée of Moët & Chandon, is named after him.

 

 

1792 – Percy Bysshe Shelley born. One of the major English Romantic poets and is critically regarded as among the finest lyric poets in the English language.  The novelist Mary Shelley (née Godwin) – creator of Frankenstein –  was his second wife.

 

1901 – Louis Armstrong born. American jazz trumpeter and singer,  coming to prominence in the 1920s as an inventive cornet and trumpet player.  Armstrong was a foundational influence in jazz, shifting the music’s focus from collective improvisation to solo performance. With his instantly recognizable deep and distinctive gravelly voice, he was also an influential singer, demonstrating great dexterity as an improviser, bending the lyrics and melody of a song for expressive purposes. He was also greatly skilled at scat singing (vocalizing using sounds and syllables instead of actual lyrics).

1940 – Timi Yuro born. American soul and R&B singer-songwriter,  considered to be one of the first blue-eyed soul stylists of the rock era and creator of one of my all-time favorite Northern Soul  tracks,   “It’ll Never Be Over For Me”.

 

 

 

 

2007 – Lee Hazlewood died.  American country and pop singer, songwriter, and record producer, most widely known for his work with guitarist Duane Eddy during the late 1950s and singer Nancy Sinatra in the 1960s.

Hazlewood had a distinctive baritone voice that added a resonance to his music. Hazlewood’s collaborations with Nancy Sinatra as well as his solo output in the late 1960s and early 1970s have been praised as an essential contribution to a sound often described as “Cowboy Psychedelia” or “Saccharine Underground”.

Mr. Frankenstein

*******

 

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Almanac