Tag Archives: murder

Almanac – June 15

1381 – Wat Tyler murdered. A leader of the 1381 Peasants’ Revolt, he marched a group of protesters from Canterbury to the capital to oppose the institution of a poll tax.

While the brief rebellion enjoyed early success, Tyler was killed by officers of King Richard II during negotiations at Smithfield in London.

 

 

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1785 – Jean-François Pilâtre de Rozier and  Pierre Romain  became the first-ever known  casualties of an air crash when their hot air balloon exploded during their attempt to cross the English Channel.
After making some progress, a change of wind direction pushed them back to land some 5 km from their starting point.

The balloon suddenly deflated (without the envelope catching fire) and crashed near Wimereux in the Pas-de-Calais, from an estimated height of 1,500 feet.
A commemorative obelisk was later erected at the site of the crash.

 

 

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1878 – Eadweard Muybridge, an English photographer,  took a series of photographs to prove that all four feet of a horse leave the ground when it runs; the study became the basis of motion pictures.

 

 

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Almanac – August 28

1814 – Sheridan Le Fanu born.  Irish writer of Gothic tales and mystery novels. He was the leading ghost-story writer of the nineteenth century and was central to the development of the genre in the Victorian era. Perhaps best remembered for Carmilla, a compelling tale of a lesbian vampire, set in central Europe. This story was to greatly influence Bram Stoker in the writing of Dracula and also inspired several films, including Hammer’s The Vampire Lovers and  Roger Vadim’s  Blood and Roses .
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1833 – The Slavery Abolition Act 1833 received Royal Assent, abolishing slavery through most the British Empire.

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1906 – John Betjeman born. English poet, writer and broadcaster. He was a founding member of the Victorian Society and a passionate defender of Victorian architecture. Starting his career as a journalist, he ended it as one of the most popular British Poets Laureate to date.

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1942 – Sterling Morrison born.  Guitarist with The Velvet Underground.

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1955 – Black teenager Emmett Till  murdered in Mississippi, aged 14, after reportedly flirting with a white woman , an event that galvanized  the nascent American Civil Rights Movement.

Till was from Chicago, Illinois, visiting his relatives in the Mississippi Delta region when he spoke to 21-year-old Carolyn Bryant, the married proprietor of a small grocery store. Several nights later, Bryant’s husband Roy and his half-brother J. W. Milam arrived at Till’s great-uncle’s house where they took Till, transported him to a barn, beat him and gouged out one of his eyes, before shooting him through the head and disposing of his body in the Tallahatchie River.

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well, now you can count them one by one
it-could-be-your-son,
and you can count them two by two,
it-could-be-me-and-you
well, into-the-river-they-go, into-the-river-they-go,
now you can count them five by five,
now-they-don’t-come-out-a-live.
now you can count them six by six
in-Mississippi, they-got-it-fixed.
now you can count them seven by seven,
Mississippi, it-ain’t-no-heav-en
now you can count them eight by eight,
and-they-were thrown-in-because-of-hate.
now you can count them Nine by Nine
and Mississippi this a no Crime
you can count them Ten by Ten
and you would wonder when the right win

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Almanac – August 9

1945 – Nagasaki, Japan was devastated when an atomic bomb, Fat Man, was dropped by the United States B-29 Bockscar. 39,000 people were killed outright.

1962 – Hermann Hesse died. German-Swiss poet, novelist, and painter. His best-known works include Steppenwolf, Siddhartha, and The Glass Bead Game, each of which explores an individual’s search for authenticity, self-knowledge and spirituality.  He received the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1946,

1965 – Singapore was expelled from Malaysia and became the first and only country to date to gain independence unwillingly.

1967 – Joe Orton died.  English playwright and author. His public career was short but prolific, lasting from 1964 until his death. During this brief period he shocked, outraged, and amused audiences with his scandalous black comedies. The adjective Ortonesque is sometimes used to refer to work characterised by a similarly dark yet farcical cynicism.
Orton was murdered by his lover, Kenneth Halliwell, who  bludgeoned him  to death at his home in Islington, London, with nine hammer blows to the head, and then himself committed suicide with an overdose of 22 Nembutal tablets washed down with the juice from canned grapefruit.

1969 – Followers of Charles Manson murdered  pregnant actress Sharon Tate (wife of Roman Polanski), coffee heiress Abigail Folger, Polish actor Wojciech Frykowski, men’s hairstylist Jay Sebring and recent high-school graduate Steven Parent.

1971 –  The British security forces in Northern Ireland  launched  Operation Demetrius. Hundreds of people were arrested and interned, thousands were displaced, and 24 were killed in the violence that followed. Its introduction, and the abuse of those interned, led to numerous protests.

1995 – Jerry Garcia died.  American musician,  best known for his lead guitar work, singing and songwriting with the Grateful Dead.

Mr. Frankenstein

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