Tag Archives: Moors

Almanac – May11

1811 – Chang and Eng Bunker born.  Conjoined twin brothers whose condition and birthplace became the basis for the term “Siamese twins”.

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1812 – British Prime Minister Spencer Perceval  assassinated by John Bellingham in the lobby of the House of Commons, London.

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1894 – Martha Graham born. American modern dancer and choreographer whose influence on dance has been compared with the influence Picasso had on the modern visual arts,  Stravinsky had on music, or Frank Lloyd Wright had on architecture.

She danced and choreographed for over seventy years –  “I have spent all my life with dance and being a dancer. It’s permitting life to use you in a very intense way. Sometimes it is not pleasant. Sometimes it is fearful. But nevertheless it is inevitable.”

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1904 – Salvador Dalí born. Spanish surrealist painter,  best known for the striking and bizarre images. Dalí’s expansive artistic repertoire included film, sculpture, and photography, in collaboration with a range of artists in a variety of media.

Dalí attributed his “love of everything that is gilded and excessive, my passion for luxury and my love of oriental clothes” to a self-styled “Arab lineage“, claiming that his ancestors were descended from the Moors.

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1981 – Bob Marley died.  Jamaican singer-songwriter and musician.

He was the rhythm guitarist and lead singer for  The Wailers (1963-1974) and Bob Marley & The Wailers (1974–1981).

 Marley remains the most widely known and the best-selling performer of reggae music, having sold more than 75 million albums worldwide. He is also credited with helping spread both Jamaican music and the Rastafari movement to a worldwide audience.

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Almanac – October 10

732 – Battle of Tours: Near Poitiers, France, the leader of the Franks, Charles Martel, and his men, defeat a large army of Moors, stopping the Muslims from spreading into Western Europe.

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1580 – After a three-day siege, the English Army beheads over 600 Irish and Papal soldiers and civilians at Dún an Óir, Ireland.

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1911 – The Wuchang Uprising leads to the demise of Qing Dynasty, the last Imperial court in China, and the founding of the Republic of China.

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1917 – Thelonious Monk born. American jazz pianist and composer considered one of the giants of American music. Monk had a unique improvisational style and made numerous contributions to the standard jazz repertoire, including “Epistrophy”, “‘Round Midnight”, “Blue Monk”, “Straight, No Chaser” and “Well, You Needn’t”.

Monk is the second-most recorded jazz composer after Duke Ellington, which is particularly remarkable as Ellington composed over 1,000 songs while Monk wrote about 70.

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1924 – Edward D. Wood, Jr. born. American screenwriter, director, producer, actor, author, and film editor, in the 1950s, Wood made a number of low-budget genre movies, in the 1960s and 1970s, made pornographic movies and wrote over 80 pulp crime, horror, and sex novels.
Films included  Glen or Glenda, Jail Bait,  Bride of the Monster, The Violent Years, Night of the Ghouls, The Sinister Urge, Orgy of the Dead, and of course that low-budget zombie/UFO classic    Plan 9 from Outer Space.

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1957 – A fire at the Windscale nuclear plant,  Cumbria, U.K. was the world’s first major nuclear accident , ranked in severity at level 5 on the 7-point International Nuclear Event Scale. The name Windscale developed such a poor reputation generally  that the authoroities changed it to Sellafield.

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1985 – Orson Welles died. American actor, director, writer and producer who worked extensively in theater, radio and film. He is best remembered for his innovative work in all three media, most notably Caesar (1937), a groundbreaking Broadway adaption of Julius Caesar and the debut of the Mercury Theatre; The War of the Worlds (1938),  possibly  the most famous broadcast in the history of radio; and Citizen Kane (1941), which is consistently ranked as one of the all-time greatest films.

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2010 – Solomon Burke died, American singer-songwriter, entrepreneur, mortician, and an archbishop of the United House of Prayer For All People, known as “King Solomon,” the “King of Rock ‘n’ Soul,” and as the “Bishop of Soul,” and described as “the Muhammad Ali of soul,” and as “the most unfairly overlooked singer of soul’s golden age.”

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