Tag Archives: Mexico

Mexican Demons attacked in covert operation

A few weeks have elapsed since Mexico became the first country in the world to be subjected to a covert mass exorcism – but we are still awaiting proof that its demons have fled to pastures new.

The Great Exorcism (exorcismo magno) took place in May, and was presided over by Cardinal Juan Sandoval Íñiguez, the Archbishop Emeritus of Guadalajara – and a man who was accused last year of inciting violence against Mexico’s gay community.

According to this report, high levels of violence, as well as drug cartels and abortion in the country, were the motivation behind the exorcism which was “carried out quietly” in the Cathedral of San Luis Potos, no doubt to take Satan and his hordes by surprise.

Íñiguez presided at the closed-door ceremony, which was also attended by Archbishop Jesús Carlos Cabrero of San Luis Potosí, Spanish demonologist and exorcist Father José Antonio Fortea and a smaller group of priests and laypeople.

The event was not made known to the general public beforehand. According to Archbishop Cabrero, the reserved character of the May 20 ceremony was intended to avoid any misguided interpretations of the ritual.

Fortea said that:

The exorcism performed in San Luís Potosí is the first ever carried out in Mexico in which the exorcists came from different parts of the country and gathered together to exorcise the powers of darkness, not from a person, but from the whole country.This rite of exorcism, beautiful and liturgical, had never before taken place in any part of the world.

Full story ;  http://northstar.boards.net/thread/174/mexican-demons-attacked-covert-operation

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Almanac – June 16

BLOOMSDAY – in 1904  James Joyce began a relationship with Nora Barnacle and subsequently used the date to set the action of his novel Ulysses; this date is now traditionally called Bloomsday.

 

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1816 – Lord Byron read Fantasmagoriana to his four house guests at the Villa Diodati –  Percy Shelley, Mary Shelley, Claire Clairmont, and John Polidori –  and issued his challenge that each guest write a ghost story, which resulted  in Mary Shelley writing the novel Frankenstein, John Polidori  the short story The Vampyre, and Byron the poem Darkness

 

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1829 – Geronimo born. A prominent leader of the Bedonkohe Apache who fought against Mexico and the United States for their expansion into Apache tribal lands for several decades during the Apache Wars.


Geronimo” was the name given to him during a battle with Mexican soldiers. His Chiricahua name is often rendered as Goyathlay or Goyahkla  in English.

 

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1881 – Marie Laveau died. Louisiana Creole practitioner of Voodoo, renowned in New Orleans.


Of her magical career there is little that can be substantiated. She was said to have had a snake she named Zombi after an African god. Oral traditions suggested that the occult part of her magic mixed Roman Catholic beliefs, including saints, with African spirits and religious concepts.


Her daughter Marie Laveau II (1827 — c. 1895) also practiced Voudoun, and historical accounts often confuse the two.  Some believe that the mother was more powerful while the daughter arranged more elaborate public events (including inviting attendees to St. John’s Eve rituals on Bayou St. John), but it is not known which (if not both) had done more to establish the voodoo queen reputation.


Marie Laveau was reportedly buried in Saint Louis Cemetery No. 1 in New Orleans in the Glapion family crypt. The tomb continues to attract visitors who draw three “x”s (XXX) on its side, in the hopes that Laveau’s spirit will grant them a wish.

Some  researchers claim that Laveau is buried in other tombs, but they may be confusing the resting places of other voodoo priestesses of New Orleans.

 

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1963 – Soviet cosmonaut Valentina Tereshkova became the first woman in space.


During her three-day mission, in Vostok 6,  she performed various tests on herself to collect data on the female body’s reaction to spaceflight.


After the dissolution of the first group of female cosmonauts in 1969, she became a prominent member of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union, holding various political offices. She remained politically active following the collapse of the Soviet Union and is still revered as a heroine in post-Soviet Russia.

 

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1999 – Screaming Lord Sutch died. Cult English singer and musican, and founder of the Official Monster Raving Loony Party, who he served as its leader from 1983 to 1999, during which time he stood in numerous parliamentary elections.


Sutch was also a pioneer of pirate radio in the UK, and worked with the legendary record producer  Joe Meek.


His album Lord Sutch and Heavy Friends was named – unfairly ! –  in a 1998 BBC poll as the worst album of all time, despite the fact that Jimmy Page, John Bonham, Jeff Beck, Noel Redding and Nicky Hopkins performed on it and helped write it.


Sutch suffered from depression and committed suicide by hanging.

 

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Almanac – February 17

1600 –  Giordano Bruno  burned alive, for heresy, at Campo de’ Fiori in Rome.

Italian Dominican friar, philosopher, mathematician and astronomer. His cosmological theories went beyond the Copernican model in proposing that the Sun was essentially a star, and moreover, that the universe contained an infinite number of inhabited worlds populated by other intelligent beings.

The free-thinking Roman Catholic church naturally embraced such views with the  same sort of enthusiasm that they now reserve for condoms, and, after the  Roman Inquisition  found him guilty of heresey,  he was burnt at the stake.

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1864 – Banjo Paterson born. Australian bush poet, journalist and author, he wrote many ballads and poems about Australian life, focusing particularly on the rural and outback areas, including the district around Binalong, New South Wales, where he spent much of his childhood.

Paterson’s more notable poems include “Waltzing Matilda”, “The Man from Snowy River” and “Clancy of the Overflow”.

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1909 – Geronimo died. Prominent leader of the Bedonkohe Apache who fought against Mexico and the United States for their expansion into Apache tribal lands for several decades during the Apache Wars.

“Geronimo” was the name given to him during a battle with Mexican soldiers. His Chiricahua name is often rendered as Goyathlay or Goyahkla in English.

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1982 – Thelonious Monk died. American jazz pianist and composer considered one of the giants of American music.

Monk had a unique improvisational style and made numerous contributions to the standard jazz repertoire, including “Epistrophy”, “‘Round Midnight”, “Blue Monk”, “Straight, No Chaser” and “Well, You Needn’t”.

Monk is the second-most recorded jazz composer after Duke Ellington, which is particularly remarkable as Ellington composed over 1,000 songs while Monk wrote about 70.

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Almanac – July 20th

356 BC – Alexander the Great, Macedonian king born.
Alexander was tutored by Aristotle until the age of 16. By the age of thirty, he had created one of the largest empires of the ancient world, stretching from the Ionian Sea to the Himalayas. He was undefeated in battle and is considered one of history’s most successful commanders. And dead by the age of 32.

1893 –  George Llewelyn Davies born.  Said to be the model for Peter Pan in J.M Barrie’s 1904 play  Peter Pan, or The Boy Who Wouldn’t Grow Up.  Unlike his alter ego, he died aged 21 of a gunshot to the head in World War I.

1923 – Pancho Villa, Mexican revolutionary, assassinated by  a group of seven riflemen who  appeared in the middle of the road and fired over 40 shots into the automobile carrying Villa.  In the fusillade of shots, Villa was hit by 9 Dumdum bullets in his head and upper chest, killing him instantly. He was found in the driver seat of the car, with one hand reaching for his gun.

A strange coincidence (or maybe not) coinsidering the Peter Pan link with this date, but…

1930“Many hundreds of boys are perched in trees throughout the United States,” it was reported.

“…and this mania for endurance sitting is ravaging some towns. At Camden, New Jersey, no fewer than 104 boys are living in tree tops, some declaring their intention not to descend until winter.”

One lad in Kansas had been aloft for 230 hours. Another, in New Orleans, asked a priest to conduct a tree-sitting Mass, but fell before it could be done. A number of boys had been injured in falls. Emergency by-laws had failed to stamp out the unexplained new craze.

1945 – French poet,  essayist, and philosopher  Paul Valery died.  Born Ambroise-Paul-Toussaint-Jules Valéry, his interests were sufficiently broad that he can be classified as a polymath. In addition to his poetry and fiction (drama and dialogues) and aphorisms on art, history, letters, music, and current events, he also wrote many misanthropic diatribes on human nature.

1960 – Sirimavo Bandaranaike was elected the World’s first woman prime minister in Ceylon [now Sri Lanka].

1969 – Men landed on the Moon for the first time…or was it faked in a film studio ?

1973 – Bruce Lee died.  Born Lee Jun-fan;  a Chinese- American Hong Kong actor, martial arts instructor, philosopher, film director, film producer, screenwriter, founder of Jeet Kune Do, and the son of Cantonese opera actor Lee Hoi-Chuen. He is widely considered by many commentators, critics, media and other martial artists to be the greatest and most influential martial artist of all time, a  pop culture icon of the 20th Century, and often credited with changing the way Asians were presented in American films. Like Alexander the Great at the top of this page, he died aged 32.

1977 – The CIA in America  releases documents under the Freedom of Information Act revealing it had engaged in mind control experiments.

Mr. Frankenstein

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Almanac- June 20th

1649 – Death of Richard Brandon, official executioner for the City of London and generally supposed to be the man who decapitated Charles I.

1756 – The infamous Black Hole Of Calcutta incident took place, in which an unconfirmed number of British prisoners died [some sources say 123].

1763 –  Wolfe Tone  [ Theobald Wolfe Tone] born.  A leading Irish revolutionary figure and one of the founding members of the United Irishmen and is regarded as the father of Irish Republicanism. He also lent his name to a band…

 

1923 – Death of Mexican revolutionary Pancho Villa.

 

Mr. Frankenstein

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