Tag Archives: Lewis Carroll

Almanac – May 04

1471 –  The Battle of Tewkesbury: Edward IV defeated a Lancastrian Army and killed Edward, Prince of Wales.

I mention this here merely because I once took part in a re-enactment of this battle… (dont ask).
 
I was part of Edward IV’s victorious Yorkist army, though due to lack of enacters I was killed twice, returning to life each time to make up numbers. My life as a medieval zombie soldier…

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1852 – Alice Liddell born. Original of Alice In Wonderland.

In  July 1862, in a rowing boat travelling on the Isis from Folly Bridge, Oxford to Godstow for a picnic outing, 10-year-old Alice asked Charles Dodgson (who wrote under the pen name Lewis Carroll) to entertain her and her sisters, Edith (aged 8) and Lorina (13), with a story.

Dodgson duly  regaled the girls with fantastic stories of a girl, named Alice, and her adventures after she fell into a rabbit-hole.

The story was not unlike those Dodgson had spun for the sisters before, but this time Liddell asked  Dodgson to write it down for her. He promised to do so but did not get around to the task for some months.

He eventually presented her with the manuscript of Alice’s Adventures Under Ground in November 1864.

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1961 –  The Freedom Riders began a bus trip through the American  South.

Freedom Riders were civil rights activists who rode interstate buses into the segregated southern United States in 1961 and following years to challenge the non-enforcement of the United States Supreme Court decisions Irene Morgan v. Commonwealth of Virginia (1946) and Boynton v. Virginia (1960), which ruled that segregated public buses were unconstitutional.

 The Southern states had ignored the rulings and the federal government did nothing to enforce them. The first Freedom Ride left Washington, D.C., on May 4, 1961, and was scheduled to arrive in New Orleans on May 17.

The Freedom Riders challenged the status quo by riding interstate buses in the South in mixed racial groups to challenge local laws or customs that enforced segregation in seating.

The Freedom Rides, and the violent reactions they provoked, bolstered the credibility of the American Civil Rights Movement and  called national attention to the disregard for the federal law and the local violence used to enforce segregation in the southern United States.

Police arrested riders for trespassing, unlawful assembly, and violating state and local Jim Crow laws, along with other alleged offenses, but they often first let white mobs attack them without intervention.

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1970 –  Kent State shootings: the Ohio National Guard, sent to Kent State University after disturbances in the city of Kent the weekend before, opened fire killing four unarmed students and wounding nine others. The students were protesting the United States’ invasion of Cambodia.

There was a significant national response to the shootings: hundreds of universities, colleges, and high schools closed throughout the United States due to a student strike of four million students, and the event further affected the public opinion—at an already socially contentious time—over the role of the United States in the Vietnam War.

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Almanac – August 2

1100 – William Rufus [William II, second Norman king of England]  killed  while hunting in the New Forest, by an arrow through the lung, but the circumstances remain unclear. The arrow was alledgedly shot by a nobleman named Walter Tirel,  although the description of events was later embroidered with more information,  the earliest statement of the event was in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, which only  noted that the king was “shot by an arrow by one of his own men”.

Later chroniclers added the name of the alledged killer  and a number of other details which may or may not be true.The first mention of any location more exact than the New Forest comes from John Leland writing in 1530 who stated that the king died at Thorougham a placename which has since fallen into disuse but was probably located at what is now Park Farm on the Beaulieu estates.



1865 – Alice’s Adventures In Wonderland by Lewis Carroll first published – then quickly withdrawn due to bad printing. Only 21 copies of this first edition known to survive.

1876 – Wild Bill Hickok died while  playing poker at Nuttal & Mann’s Saloon No. 10 in Deadwood, in the Black Hills, Dakota Territory. He  usually sat with his back to a wall, but the only seat available when he joined the poker game that night was a chair that put his back to a door. Twice he asked another player, Charles Rich, to change seats with him, and on both occasions Rich refused.

A former buffalo hunter named John McCall (better known as “Jack” or “Broken Nose Jack” McCall) walked in unnoticed. McCall walked to within a few feet of Hickok, drew a pistol and shouted, “Take that!” before firing at Hickok.McCall’s bullet hit Hickok in the back of the head, killing him instantly. The bullet emerged through Hickok’s right cheek, striking a  Captain Massie in the left wrist.

When shot, Hickock was holding a pair of aces and a pair of eights, all black. The fifth card’s identity is debated, or perhaps it  had been discarded and its replacement had not yet been dealt.



1898 – The first disc record recorded in the UK. Syria Lamonte singing Comin’ Thro The Rye.

1997 – William S. Burroughs died. American novelist, short story writer, essayist and spoken word performer. A primary figure of the Beat Generation and a major postmodernist author, he is considered to be one of the most politically trenchant, culturally influential, and innovative artists of the 20th century. His influence is considered to have affected a range of popular culture as well as literature. Burroughs wrote 18 novels and novellas, six collections of short stories and four collections of essays. Five books have been published of his interviews and correspondences. He also collaborated on projects and recordings with numerous performers and musicians, and made many appearances in films.

Mr. Frankenstein

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