Tag Archives: Jimi Hendrix

Almanac – June 02

1692 – Bridget Bishop was the first person to go to trial in the Salem witch trials in Salem, Massachusetts.

She wasaccused of bewitching five young women, Abigail Williams, Ann Putnam, Jr., Mercy Lewis, Mary Walcott, and Elizabeth Hubbard, but  she may also have been accused because she owned one or more taverns, played shuffleboard, dressed in provocative clothing, and was outspoken.

She was hanged on June 10 1692.

.

1740 – Marquis de Sade born. French aristocrat, revolutionary politician, philosopher and writer, famous for his libertine sexuality.

His works include novels, short stories, plays, dialogues and political tracts; in his lifetime some were published under his own name, while others appeared anonymously and Sade denied being their author.

 He is best known for his erotic works, which combined philosophical discourse with pornography, depicting sexual fantasies with an emphasis on violence, criminality and blasphemy against the Catholic Church.

He was a proponent of extreme freedom, unrestrained by morality, religion or law. The words “sadism” and “sadist” are derived from his name.

.

.

2008 – Bo Diddley died. American R&B vocalist, guitarist, songwriter (usually as Ellas McDaniel), and rock and roll pioneer.

He was  known as The Originator because of his key role in the transition from the blues to rock, influencing a host of acts, including Buddy Holly, Jimi Hendrix, The Rolling Stones, Pink Floyd, The Velvet Underground, The Who, The Yardbirds, Eric Clapton, Elvis Presley, and The Beatles, among others.

 He introduced more insistent, driving rhythms and a hard-edged electric guitar sound on a wide-ranging catalog of songs, along with African rhythms and a signature beat (a simple five-accent clave rhythm) that remains a cornerstone of rock and pop.

.

.

A&A forum banner

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Almanac

Almanac – December 30

1928 – Bo Diddley born. American rhythm and blues vocalist, guitarist, songwriter (usually as Ellas McDaniel), and rock and roll pioneer. 

He was  known as The Originator because of his key role in the transition from the blues to rock, influencing a host of acts, including Buddy Holly, Jimi Hendrix, The Rolling Stones, The Velvet Underground, The Who, The Yardbirds, Eric Clapton, Elvis Presley, The Beatles, and George Michael, among others.

He introduced more insistent, driving rhythms and a hard-edged electric guitar sound on a wide-ranging catalog of songs, along with African rhythms and a signature beat (a simple, five-accent rhythm) that remains a cornerstone of rock and pop.

.

.

1946 – Patti Smith born. American singer-songwriter, poet and visual artist, who became a highly influential component of the New York City punk rock movement with her 1975 debut album Horses.

.

.

Leave a comment

Filed under Almanac

Almanac – November 27

1703 – The first Eddystone Lighthouse was destroyed in the Great Storm of 1703.

.

.

1940 – Bruce Lee born. Actor, martial arts instructor,  philosopher, and filmmaker.  Lee was the son of Cantonese opera star Lee Hoi-Chuen. He is widely considered by commentators, critics, media and other martial artists to be one of the most influential martial artists of all time,  and a pop culture icon of the 20th century.He is often credited with helping to change the way Asians were presented in American films.

.

.

1942 – Jimi Hendrix born. American musician, singer and songwriter. Despite a limited mainstream exposure of four years, he is widely considered to have been the greatest electric guitarist in the history of popular music, and one of the most important musicians of the 20th century.

.

.

1953 – Eugene O’Neill died. American playwright and Nobel laureate in Literature. His  plays were among the first to introduce into American drama techniques of realism earlier associated with Russian playwright Anton Chekhov, Norwegian playwright Henrik Ibsen, and Swedish playwright August Strindberg and among the first to include speeches in American vernacular and involve characters on the fringes of society, where they struggle to maintain their hopes and aspirations, but ultimately slide into disillusionment and despair.

.

.

1981 – Lotte Lenya died. Austrian singer, diseuse, and actress. In the German-speaking and classical music world she is best remembered for her performances of the songs of her husband, Kurt Weill. In English-language film she is remembered for her Academy Award-nominated role in The Roman Spring of Mrs. Stone (1961) and as the sadistic and vengeful Rosa Klebb in the James Bond movie From Russia with Love (1963).

.

.

1998 – Barbara Acklin died. American soul singer and songwriter who was most successful in the 1960s and 1970s. Her biggest hit as a singer was “Love Makes a Woman” in 1968. As a songwriter, she is best known for co-writing “Have You Seen Her” with Eugene Record, lead singer of the Chi-Lites.

.

Leave a comment

Filed under Almanac

Almanac – September 18

St. Joseph of Cupertino’s Day
Patron saint of Astronauts

.

1709 – Samuel Johnson born. English author who made lasting contributions to English literature as a poet, essayist, moralist, literary critic, biographer, editor and lexicographer.

.

1905 – Greta Garbo born.  Swedish film actress and an international star and icon during Hollywood’s silent and classic periods. Many of her films were sensational hits, and all but three of her twenty-four Hollywood films were profitable.

.

.

1911 – Brinsley Le Poer Trench born. Trench – who was also 8th Earl of Clancarty – was a firm believer in flying saucers, and in particular, the Hollow Earth theory, ideas he discussed in his book Secret of the Ages: UFOs from Inside the Earth. He also claimed that he could trace his descent from 63,000 BC, when beings from other planets had landed on Earth in spaceships.
Most humans, he said, were descended from these aliens: “This accounts for all the different colour skins we’ve got here,” he said in 1981. A few of these early aliens did not come from space, he explained, but emerged through tunnels from a civilisation which “still existed beneath the Earth’s crust.” There were seven or eight of these tunnels altogether, one at the North Pole, another at the South Pole, and others in such places as Tibet. “I haven’t been down there myself,” he said, “but from what I gather [these beings] are very advanced.”

.

1939 – The Nazi propaganda broadcaster known as Lord Haw-Haw began transmitting. It was the nickname of several announcers on the English-language propaganda radio programme Germany Calling, broadcast by Nazi German radio to audiences in Great Britain on the medium wave station Reichssender Hamburg and by shortwave to the United States, though it later came to be exclusively applied to   William Joyce, who was German radio’s most prominent English-language speaker.

.

1964 – Sean O’Casey died.  Irish dramatist and memoirist. A committed socialist, he was the first Irish playwright of note to write about the Dublin working classes.

.



.

1970 – Jimi Hendrix died.  American musician and singer-songwriter. Widely considered to be the greatest electric guitarist in music history and one of the most influential musicians of his era despite his mainstream exposure being limited to four years.

.



.

2004 – Russ Meyer died. American  motion picture director, producer, screenwriter, cinematographer, editor, actor and photographer,  known primarily for writing and directing a series of successful low-budget sexploitation films that featured campy humor, sly satire and large-breasted women, including such notable films as Faster, Pussycat! Kill! Kill! (1965) and Vixen! (1968).

Faster Pusycat Kill ! Kill ! is one of my all-time favorite films.

.

Leave a comment

Filed under Almanac

Jayne Mansfield & Jimi Hendrix

Today being the 45th anniversary of the death of Jayne Mansfield  got me remembering  the single  she recorded with Jimi Hendrix.

Well – sort of. It was Jayne’s record,  pre-fame Jimi, playing bass and lead, appeared as a session musician. I’ve no idea if they were even in the studio at the same time – according to Hendrix historian Steven Roby (Black Gold: The Lost Archives Of Jimi Hendrix, Billboard Books), this collaboration occurred because they shared the same manager.

The tracks were “As The Clouds Drift By”  b/w  “Suey”

Details for the UK release-

Composers:   As The Clouds Drift By – (Brodsky)  Suey – (Ed Chalpin, Douglas Henderson)
Producer:  Ed Chalpin?
Release date:  21 July 1967
Label:  London
Catalog number: HL 10147

 

 

Kind of nice in a 1960s girl-group way, with maybe a nod towards Marianne Faithfull ?

 

 

A bit more raunchy, this one, a bit more funky. I have this fantasy of her being backed by The Cramps…what a collaboration that would have been.

Never a dumb blonde, Jayne  had classical training in piano and violin. She sang in English and German for a number of her films, and in  1964  MGM Records  released a novelty album called Jayne Mansfield: Shakespeare, Tchaikovsky & Me, in which she recited Shakespeare’s sonnets and poems by Marlowe, Browning, Wordsworth, and others against a background of Tchaikovsky’s music. The album cover depicted a bouffant-coiffed Mansfield with lips pursed and breasts barely covered by a fur stole, posing between busts of Tchaikovsky and Shakespeare. The New York Times described the album as a reading of “30-odd poems in a husky, urban, baby voice”.

 

 

I’d rather like to hear more of that album. It kind of reminds me of the rather strange late-1960s album that actor Peter Wyngarde recorded…but that’s another story.

 

Mr. Frankenstein

*******

Leave a comment

Filed under Music