Tag Archives: Italy

Vial of John Paul II’s Blood ‘Stolen by Satanists’

A vial containing the late Pope John Paul II’s blood has been stolen from a small church in central Italy along with a cross, according to reports.

The tube contained bloodied clothing from the botched assassination attempt on the Pope , and is  one of only three known vials containing the blood of the Polish Pope, who is expected to be declared a saint in a ceremony at the Vatican on 27 April.
They are considered to be of great religious significance. but this  is not the first time one of them has been stolen. In 2012 a priest travelling north from Rome had his backpack stolen by three thieves. It contained an intricate relic of blood, which had been taken from Pope John Paul II in 1981. T the relic was eventually retrieved having been thrown into reeds next to a nearby railway station.

Meanwhile, more than 50 Carabinieri, the national military police of Italy, are involved in a manhunt along with sniffer dogs around the church of St Peter of the Ienca, near Aquila, in the mountainous Abruzzo region, while according to the Osservatorio Antiplagio“a watchdog on media scams” – the vial theft could be related to Satanism.

The  blood was stolen (they claim) on the day “that corresponds to the dominium of the demon Volac”,  and  “Another factor is International Holocaust Remembrance Day, which prompts satanic rituals in preparation for the Satan’s birthday on 1 February,”

Volac – also Ualac, Valak, Valax, Valu, Valic, Valac – for those who have been neglecting their demonology, is the mighty Great President of Hell, having thirty ( some say thirty-eight) legions of demons under his command.

 He is said to give true answers about hidden treasures; he reveals where serpents can be seen, and delivers them harmless to the magician. He can lead one toward a good job, a sympathetic friend. He also provides lucky numbers.

He is said to appear as a small poor boy with angel wings riding on a two-headed dragon. He moves fast,  flies very fast and usually departs through the ceiling.

More Volac trivia –

    Volac is a Night Demon
    Zodiac Position: 5-9 degrees of Aquarius
    January 25th-29th
    Tarot Card: 5 of Swords
    Planet: Saturn/Uranus
    Candle Color: White
    Plant: Sesame
    Metal: Lead/Uranium
    Element: Air
    Rank: President

Never heard of Satan ever having a birthday… as an angel, wasn’t he created basically from kit form, not born ?  February 1st – well, February 2nd is Candlemas (or Imbolc to the celts) but has no Satanic connections I can ever recall hearing of.

Candlemas / Imbolc is accociated with the goddess Brighid (aka Bride), and it’s interesting to note that an old Scots gaelic rhyme for February 2nd has it that –

Moch maduinn Bhride,
Thig an nimhir as an toll;
Cha bhoin mise ris an nimhir,
Cha bhoin an nimhir rium.

or, in English –

Early on Bride’s morn,
the serpent will come from the hollow
I will not molest the serpent,
nor will the serpent molest me

Which kind of brings us back to Volac, who “reveals where serpents can be seen, and delivers them harmless to the magician”. No doubt pure coincidence, but an interesting one.

What any of this has to do with someone pinching a dead pope’s blood is anybodies guess….

.

A&A forum banner

Leave a comment

Filed under Weird Shit

Almanac – April 28

1789 –  The Mutiny on the Bounty, aboard the British Royal Navy ship HMS Bounty.

The mutiny was led by Fletcher Christian against commanding officer Lieutenant William Bligh. According to most accounts, the sailors were attracted to the idyllic life on the Pacific island of Tahiti and were further motivated by harsh treatment from their captain.

Mutineers set  Bligh afloat in a small boat with  some crew loyal to him. The mutineers then variously settled on Pitcairn Island or in Tahiti and burned the Bounty off Pitcairn Island, to avoid detection and to prevent desertion.

Bligh navigated the 23-foot (7 m) open launch on a 47-day voyage to Timor in the Dutch East Indies, equipped with a quadrant and pocket watch and without charts or compass. He recorded the distance as 3,618 nautical miles (6,710 km). He then returned to Britain and reported the mutiny to the Admiralty on 15 March 1790, 2 years and 11 weeks after his original departure.

Descendants of some of the mutineers still live on Pitcairn Island.

.

.

1945 – Benito Mussolini and his mistress Clara Petacci were executed by a firing squad consisting of members of the Italian resistance movement. He had been traveling with retreating German forces and was apprehended while attempting to escape recognition by wearing a German military uniform.

His body was then taken to Milan where it was hung upside down at a petrol station for public viewing and to provide confirmation of his demise.

.

.

1948 – Terry Pratchett born.  English author of fantasy novels,  best known for the Discworld series of about 40 volumes –  since his first Discworld novel (The Colour of Magic) was published in 1983, he has written two books a year on average.

His latest Discworld book, Snuff, was at the time of its release the third-fastest-selling hardback adult-audience novel since records began in the United Kingdom, selling 55,000 copies in the first three days.

Pratchett was the UK’s best-selling author of the 1990s, and has sold over 70 million books worldwide in 37 languages.  He is currently the second most-read writer in the UK, and seventh most-read non-US author in the US.

.

.

A&A forum banner

Leave a comment

Filed under Almanac

Almanac – April 02

742 – Charlemagne born. King of the Franks from 768, the King of Italy from 774, the first Holy Roman Emperor,  called the “Father of Europe” (pater Europae),  his empire united most of Western Europe for the first time since the Roman Empire.

His rule spurred the Carolingian Renaissance, a revival of art, religion, and culture through the medium of the Catholic Church. Through his foreign conquests and internal reforms, Charlemagne encouraged the formation of a common European identity.  Both the French and German monarchies considered their kingdoms to be descendants of Charlemagne’s empire.

.

.

1725 – Giacomo Casanova born.  Italian adventurer and author from the Republic of Venice.

He was, by vocation and avocation, a lawyer, clergyman, military officer, violinist, con man, pimp, gourmand, dancer, businessman, diplomat, spy, politician, medic, mathematician, social philosopher, cabalist, playwright, and writer. He wrote over twenty works, including plays and essays, and many letters. His novel Icosameron is an early work of science fiction.

He has become so famous for his often complicated and elaborate affairs with women that his name is now synonymous with “womanizer“.

.

.

1891 – Max Ernst born. German painter, sculptor, graphic artist, and poet. A prolific artist, Ernst was a primary pioneer of the Dada movement and Surrealism.

Ernst developed a fascination with birds that was prevalent in his work. His alter ego in paintings, which he called Loplop, was a bird. He suggested that this alter-ego was an extension of himself stemming from an early confusion of birds and humans.

 He said that one night when he was young he woke up and found that his beloved bird had died, and a few minutes later his father announced that his sister was born. Loplop often appeared in collages of other artists’ work, such as Loplop presents André Breton.

.

.

1928 – Serge Gainsbourg born. French singer, songwriter, poet, composer, artist, actor and director. Regarded as one of the most important figures in French popular music, he was renowned for his often provocative and scandalous releases, as well as his diverse artistic output, which embodied genres ranging from jazz, chanson, pop and yé-yé, to reggae, funk, rock, electronic and disco music.

Gainsbourg’s extremely varied musical style and individuality make him difficult to categorize. His legacy has been firmly established, and he is often regarded as one of the world’s most influential popular musicians.

.

.

1941 – Dr. Demento born. American radio broadcaster and record collector specializing in novelty songs, comedy, and strange or unusual recordings dating from the early days of phonograph records to the present.

He is credited with introducing new generations of listeners to artists of the early and middle twentieth century whom they may not have otherwise discovered, such as Haywire Mac, Spike Jones, Benny Bell, Yogi Yorgesson, and Tom Lehrer, as well as with bringing parodist “Weird Al” Yankovic to national attention.

.

.

2003 – Edwin Starr died.  American soul music singer. Starr is most famous for his Norman Whitfield produced Motown singles of the 1970s, most notably the number one hit “War”.

.

.

A&A forum banner

Leave a comment

Filed under Almanac

Almanac – March 25

421 – Venice  founded, according to legend,  identified with the dedication of the first church, that of San Giacomo at the islet of Rialto ,which is said to have been at the stroke of noon on 25 March 421

.

.

1807 – The Slave Trade Act became law, abolishing the slave trade in the British Empire.  The act abolished the slave trade but not slavery itself.

Slavery on English soil was unsupported in English law and that position was confirmed in Somersett’s Case in 1772, but it remained legal in most of the British Empire until the Slavery Abolition Act 1833.

.

.

1931 – Tom Wilson born. American record producer best known for his work with Sun Ra,  Bob Dylan, Frank Zappa, Simon and Garfunkel and The Velvet Underground.

As a staff producer at Columbia Records he  was one of the ‘midwives’ of folk-rock, producing three of Bob Dylan’s key 1960s albums: The Times They Are a-Changin’, Another Side of Bob Dylan, and Bringing It All Back Home, along with the 1965 single, “Like a Rolling Stone.”

.

.

1942 – Aretha Franklin born.  American musician, singer, songwriter, and pianist. In a recording career that has spanned over half a century, her repertoire has included gospel, jazz, blues, R&B, pop, rock and funk.

She has been described as “the voice of the civil rights movement, the voice of the black America” and a symbol of black equality.

She first became connected with the movement through her father, Reverend C.L. Franklin, a preacher, who traveled the country as well as recorded a weekly sermon for the radio station, WLAC, which reached 65 percent of the African-American population.

On tours with her father, Franklin began her singing career. Rev. Franklin also introduced Franklin to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., starting a lifelong friendship between the two.

.

.

A&A forum banner

Leave a comment

Filed under Almanac

Almanac – March 01

1692 – In Massachusetts, a female slave named Tituba who had been accused of practising witchcraft confessed, leading to further accusations and the outbreak of mass hysteria known as the Salem Witch Trials.

.

1893 – Nikola Tesla gave the first public demonstration of radio in St. Louis, Missouri. The principles of his wireless work  contained all the elements that were later incorporated into radio systems before the development of the vacuum tube.

He initially experimented with magnetic receivers, unlike the coherers (detecting devices consisting of tubes filled with iron filings which had been invented by Temistocle Calzecchi-Onesti at Fermo in Italy in 1884) used by Guglielmo Marconi and other early experimenters.

.

.

1927 – Harry Belafonte born. American singer, songwriter, actor and social activist,  dubbed the “King of Calypso” for popularizing the style with an international audience in the 1950s.

Throughout his career he has been an advocate for civil rights and humanitarian causes (which got him blacklisted during the McCarthy era)  and was a vocal critic of the policies of the George W. Bush administration.

.

.

1948 – Burning Spear (Winston Rodney) born. Jamaican roots reggae singer and musician.

.

.

1952 – First release on the Sun Records label – Driving Slow by Johnny London

.

.

A&A forum banner

Leave a comment

Filed under Almanac

Almanac – July 23

1690 – Death of Richard Gibson, aged 75. He had been court-dwarf to Charles I and a miniature-painter [in every sense of the term].

His wife, Ann Shepherd, who died 19 years later, aged 89, was court-dwarf to Queen Henrietta Maria. They had 9 children, 5 of whom survived to maturity and were of ordinary stature.

1888 – Raymond Chandler born, American novelist.

1892 – Emperor Haile Selassie of Ethiopia born. Revered as the returned messiah of the Bible, God incarnate, among the Rastafari movement  which perceives Haile Selassie as a messianic figure who will lead a future golden age of eternal peace, righteousness, and prosperity.  Haile Selassie himself was  was an Ethiopian Orthodox Christian throughout his life.

 

 

1929 – The Fascist government in Italy banned the use of foreign words.

1942 – Treblinka  Nazi extermination camp in German-occupied Poland  opened.. Approximately 870,000 died there.

1962 –  The  Telstar-1   communications satellite relayed the first publicly transmitted, live trans-Atlantic television program, featuring Walter Cronkite.

 

Telstar -1  became a victim of  Cold War technology. The day before it was launched, the USA had tested a high-altitude nuclear bomb (called Starfish Prime) which energized the Earth’s Van Allen Belt where Telstar-1 went into orbit. This vast increase in radiation, combined with subsequent high-altitude blasts, including a Soviet test in October, overwhelmed Telstar’s fragile transistors; and  it went out of service in November 1962, after handling over 400 telephone, telegraph, facsimile and television transmissions. It was restarted by a workaround in early January 1963. but the additional radiation associated with its return to full sunlight once again caused a transistor failure, this time irreparably, and Telstar-1 went out of service on February 21, 1963.

Although no longer functioning, Telstar-1 is still apparently in orbit at time of writing (July 2012).

 

Mr. Frankenstein

*******

 

 

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Almanac