Tag Archives: Ireland

St. Patrick’s Well, Dublin, Under Threat ?

The construction of the cross- city Luas line will destroy a holy well associated with St Patrick, Jonathan Swift and the introduction of frogs to Ireland, a historian has claimed.

Gary Branigan, author of Ancient & Holy Wells of Dublin, said the line would pass over St Patrick’s Well as it makes its way past Trinity College. The underground well would be destroyed in the process, he said.

The Railway Procurement Agency said it was aware of the well, which is a recorded monument, but said it would not be affected by the Luas works.

“Few pedestrians walking along modern-day Nassau Street will be aware that beneath their feet lies a hidden and ancient site of pilgrimage associated with none other than St Patrick himself,” Mr Branigan said.

“Nassau Street itself was called Patrick’s Well Lane until it was renamed in the 18th century after the accession to the throne of William III, ruler of the house of Orange-Nassau.”

Mr Branigan has called on Minister for Transport Leo Varadkar to review the route in order to preserve the well.

However the aagency said the well’s location had been incorrectly mapped and was actually under the north side of Nassau Street at the junction with Dawson Street and would not be under the new line.

“Appropriate constraints to protect the well during construction have also been included in the works contracts,” a spokeswoman said, “such as the requirement for continuous monitoring of vibration levels from construction activities in the area and the setting of appropriate vibration limits to ensure that no damage will occur to the well”.

In 1729 the well ran dry, inspiring Jonathan Swift to write a satirical poem.

Legend has it that frogs were introduced to Ireland by a Protestant who, “to show his zeal against popery”, brought frog spawn from Liverpool and deposited it in the well.

Source – Irish Times, 25 July 2013

.

forum banner

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Holy Wells

Almanac – March 19

1649 – The House of Commons of England passed an act abolishing the House of Lords, declaring  that “The Commons of England [find] by too long experience that the House of Lords is useless and dangerous to the people of England.”

The House of Lords did not assemble again until the Convention Parliament met in 1660 and the monarchy was restored.

It returned to its former position as the more powerful chamber of Parliament—a position it would occupy until the 19th century. As usual in any cess-pit, the biggest chuncks always float back to the top again.

.

1928 – Patrick McGoohan born. American-born actor, brought up in Ireland and Britain, where he established an extensive stage and film career, with his most notable roles in the 1960s television series Danger Man and cult favorite  The Prisoner, which he co-created, and  wrote and directed several episodes of .

.

.

A&A forum banner

Leave a comment

Filed under Almanac

Holy Wells & Water Lore

 

 

http://holywells.boardhost.com

HOLY WELLS & WATER LORE is a new forum decicated to…. holy wells and water lore – rivers, lakes, pools, etc. Yeah, including the Loch Ness Monster – that’s water lore.

Anyone interested in these subjects welcome to share their knowledge, photos and videos.  Although the site will probably attract more attention from British and Irish holy wells, it’s not limited to them. Anyone, anywhere welcome.

Leave a comment

Filed under Holy Wells

Almanac – October 10

732 – Battle of Tours: Near Poitiers, France, the leader of the Franks, Charles Martel, and his men, defeat a large army of Moors, stopping the Muslims from spreading into Western Europe.

.

1580 – After a three-day siege, the English Army beheads over 600 Irish and Papal soldiers and civilians at Dún an Óir, Ireland.

.

1911 – The Wuchang Uprising leads to the demise of Qing Dynasty, the last Imperial court in China, and the founding of the Republic of China.

.

1917 – Thelonious Monk born. American jazz pianist and composer considered one of the giants of American music. Monk had a unique improvisational style and made numerous contributions to the standard jazz repertoire, including “Epistrophy”, “‘Round Midnight”, “Blue Monk”, “Straight, No Chaser” and “Well, You Needn’t”.

Monk is the second-most recorded jazz composer after Duke Ellington, which is particularly remarkable as Ellington composed over 1,000 songs while Monk wrote about 70.

.

.

1924 – Edward D. Wood, Jr. born. American screenwriter, director, producer, actor, author, and film editor, in the 1950s, Wood made a number of low-budget genre movies, in the 1960s and 1970s, made pornographic movies and wrote over 80 pulp crime, horror, and sex novels.
Films included  Glen or Glenda, Jail Bait,  Bride of the Monster, The Violent Years, Night of the Ghouls, The Sinister Urge, Orgy of the Dead, and of course that low-budget zombie/UFO classic    Plan 9 from Outer Space.

.

.

1957 – A fire at the Windscale nuclear plant,  Cumbria, U.K. was the world’s first major nuclear accident , ranked in severity at level 5 on the 7-point International Nuclear Event Scale. The name Windscale developed such a poor reputation generally  that the authoroities changed it to Sellafield.

.

1985 – Orson Welles died. American actor, director, writer and producer who worked extensively in theater, radio and film. He is best remembered for his innovative work in all three media, most notably Caesar (1937), a groundbreaking Broadway adaption of Julius Caesar and the debut of the Mercury Theatre; The War of the Worlds (1938),  possibly  the most famous broadcast in the history of radio; and Citizen Kane (1941), which is consistently ranked as one of the all-time greatest films.

.

.

2010 – Solomon Burke died, American singer-songwriter, entrepreneur, mortician, and an archbishop of the United House of Prayer For All People, known as “King Solomon,” the “King of Rock ‘n’ Soul,” and as the “Bishop of Soul,” and described as “the Muhammad Ali of soul,” and as “the most unfairly overlooked singer of soul’s golden age.”

.

Leave a comment

Filed under Almanac

Almanac – August 3

1719“A Woman, who had served the Lady Anne Harvey for about 16 years in the Quality of a Coachman, and always behaved very well, was brought to bed of a Child, to the Inexpressible Suprize of the Family, who always took her for a Man.”

The Original Weekly Journal, 1719

1527 – The first known letter from North America  sent by John Rut while at St. John’s, Newfoundland. Rut was an English mariner  who was chosen by Henry VIII to command an expedition to North America in search of the Northwest Passage; he set sail from Plymouth with two ships, on 10 June 1527.

1916 – Sir Roger Casement hanged.  Humanitarian campaigner and an Irish patriot, poet, revolutionary and nationalist.He sought to obtain German support for a rebellion in Ireland against British rule. Shortly before the Easter Rising, he  was arrested and subsequently convicted and executed by the British for treason by John Ellis and his assistants at Pentonville Prison in London.

1934 – Adolf Hitler became  the supreme leader of Germany by joining the offices of President and Chancellor into Führer.

1955 – The English-language version of Samuel Beckett‘s play Waiting For Godot first performed, at the Arts Theatre, London.

It was not an immediate success – on hearing the now famous lines “Nothing happens, nobody comes, nobody goes, it’s awful !”, a member of the audience is said to have retorted “Hear ! Hear !”.

1966 – Lenny Bruce died. American comedian, social critic and satirist. His 1964 conviction in an obscenity trial was followed by a posthumous pardon, the first in New York state history. He was renowned for his open, free-style, dangerous and critical form of comedy which integrated politics, religion, and sex. His tumultuous private life marked by substance abuse, promiscuity, as well as his efforts to prevent his wife from working as a stripper, made him a compelling figure. He paved the way for future outspoken comedians, and his trial for obscenity, in which – after being forced into bankruptcy – he was eventually found not guilty is seen as a landmark trial for freedom of speech.
Official cause of death was “acute morphine poisoning caused by an accidental overdose.

Mr. Frankenstein

*******

Leave a comment

Filed under Almanac

Almanac – June 29th

1613 – London’s Globe Theatre burned down during a performance of Shakespeare’s Henry VIII. A cannon shot employed for special effects ignited the theatre’s thatched roof (and the beams), burning the building to the ground.

1644 Charles I of England defeats a Parliamentarian detachment at the Battle of Cropredy Bridge, the last battle won by an English King on English soil. And against English people.

1916 – Irish patriot Roger Casement found guilty of treason in a Dublin court and sentenced to death.

1967 – Actress Jayne Mansfield killed in a car crash – rumors that she was decapitated are untrue, though she did suffer severe head trauma.

 

 

 

1980Vigdis Finnbogadottir elected president of Iceland, becoming Europe’s first democratically elected female head of State.

 

Mr. Frankenstein

*******

Leave a comment

Filed under Almanac

Almanac- June 20th

1649 – Death of Richard Brandon, official executioner for the City of London and generally supposed to be the man who decapitated Charles I.

1756 – The infamous Black Hole Of Calcutta incident took place, in which an unconfirmed number of British prisoners died [some sources say 123].

1763 –  Wolfe Tone  [ Theobald Wolfe Tone] born.  A leading Irish revolutionary figure and one of the founding members of the United Irishmen and is regarded as the father of Irish Republicanism. He also lent his name to a band…

 

1923 – Death of Mexican revolutionary Pancho Villa.

 

Mr. Frankenstein

.

Leave a comment

Filed under Almanac