Tag Archives: Illinois

Almanac – March 07

1274 – Saint Thomas Aquinas died. He was the foremost classical proponent of natural theology, his influence on Western thought is considerable, and much of modern philosophy was conceived in development or refutation of his ideas, particularly in the areas of ethics, natural law, metaphysics, and political theory.

He is held in the Roman Catholic Church to be the model teacher for those studying for the priesthood, and indeed the highest expression of both natural reason and speculative theology.

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1671 – Rob Roy MacGregor born.  Scottish folk hero and outlaw of the early 18th century, sometimes known as the Scottish Robin Hood. Rob Roy is anglicised from the Gaelic Raibeart Ruadh, or Red Robert – he had red hair.

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1942 – Lucy Parsons died.  American labor organizer and radical socialist and anarchist communist, described by the Chicago Police Department as “more dangerous than a thousand rioters”  (in 2004, the City of Chicago named a park after her.)

Born circa 1853 in Texas, probably as a slave, to parents of Native American, African American and Mexican ancestry, in 1871 she married Albert Parsons, a former Confederate soldier. They were forced to flee north from Texas due to intolerant reactions to their interracial marriage, and settled in Chicago, Illinois.

She died in a house fire in Chicago, believed to be 89 years old.   Her lover, George Markstall, died the next day from injuries he received while trying to save her.  After her death, police seized her library of over 1,500 books and all of her personal papers.

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1988 – Divine died. American actor, disco singer and drag queen. A character actor who often performed female roles in both cinema and theater, Divine adopted a female drag persona in his musical performances, leading People magazine to describe him as the “Drag Queen of the Century”.

Often associated with independent filmmaker John Waters, he starred in ten of his films, usually in a lead role.

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Almanac – June 27th

1497 – Cornish Rebellion leaders  Michael An Gof and Thomas Flamank executed at Tyburn, London, following the Cornish rebel’s defeat by by the King Henry VII’s forces at the Battle of Deptford Bridge on 17 June 1497.

1746 – Fresh from his defeat at Culloden, Bonnie Prince Charlie escaped over the sea to Skye, disguised as a maid. 

1844 Joseph Smith, Jr., founder of the Latter Day Saint movement, and his brother Hyrum Smith, were murdered by a mob at the Carthage, Illinois jail.

1859Mildred Hill born. She was the composer of “Happy Birthday To You”, said to be the most frequently sung song in the English language. It was originally called “Good Morning To All” and intended to brighten up morning assemblies for children [Hill was a teacher].

1905 – The famous mutiny took place aboard the Russian battleship Potemkin, in Odessa harbour, on the Black Sea. Sailors started a mutiny , denouncing the crimes of autocracy, demanding liberty and an end to war. Later the subject of a film by Sergei Eisenstein.

 

 

Mr. Frankenstein

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