Tag Archives: gothic novel

Almanac – April 20

1912 – Bram Stoker died.  Irish novelist and short story writer, best known today for his 1897 Gothic novel Dracula.

During his lifetime, he was better known as personal assistant of actor Henry Irving and business manager of the Lyceum Theatre in London, which Irving owned.

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1939 – Billie Holiday recorded “Strange Fruit“, considered by some to be the first Civil Rights song.

Written by Abel Meeropol, a white Jewish high-school teacher from the Bronx, and a member of the Communist Party, it exposed American racism, particularly the lynching of African Americans.

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1943 – Edie Sedgwick born. American actress, socialite, fashion model and heiress. She is best known for being one of Andy Warhol‘s superstars.

Sedgwick became known as “The Girl of the Year” in 1965 after starring in several of Warhol’s short films.

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Almanac – February 01

St. Bride’s Day

St Bride – or Brigid – was supposed to have helped out at the birth of Jesus of Nazareth. In reality she’s a christianization of the great Celtic goddess Brigit.

This is the Day of Bride
The Queen will come from the mound
This is the Day of Bride
The serpent will come from the hole

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1851 –  Mary Shelley died. English novelist, short story writer, dramatist, essayist, biographer, and travel writer, best known for her Gothic novel Frankenstein: or, The Modern Prometheus (1818).

She also edited and promoted the works of her husband, the Romantic poet and philosopher Percy Bysshe Shelley. Her father was the political philosopher William Godwin, and her mother was the philosopher and feminist Mary Wollstonecraft.

 

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1911 – Edward Mylius was sentenced to one year in prison for accusing George V of bigamy.

 

 

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February 1, 2013 · 13:33

Almanac – November 08

1308 – John  Duns Scotus died. Probably Scottish born and generally reckoned to be one of the three most important philosopher-theologians of the High Middle Ages, Scotus has had considerable influence on both Catholic and secular thought.

The doctrines for which he is best known are the “univocity of being,” that existence is the most abstract concept we have, applicable to everything that exists; the formal distinction, a way of distinguishing between different aspects of the same thing; and the idea of haecceity, the property supposed to be in each individual thing that makes it an individual.

Scotus also developed a complex argument for the existence of God, and argued for the Immaculate conception of Mary.

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1656 – Edmond Halley born. English astronomer, geophysicist, mathematician, meteorologist, and physicist who is best known for computing the orbit of the eponymous Halley’s Comet.

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1847 – Bram Stoker born.  Irish novelist and short story writer, best known today for his 1897 Gothic novel Dracula.

During his lifetime, he was better known as personal assistant of actor Henry Irving and business manager of the Lyceum Theatre in London, which Irving owned.

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1887 – Doc Holliday died.  American gambler, gunfighter and dentist of the American Old West, who is usually remembered for his friendship with Wyatt Earp and his involvement in the Gunfight at the O.K. Corral.

In an 1896 article, Wyatt Earp said that “Doc was a dentist, not a lawman or an assassin, whom necessity had made a gambler; a gentleman whom disease had made a frontier vagabond; a philosopher whom life had made a caustic wit; a long lean ash-blond fellow nearly dead with consumption, and at the same time the most skillful gambler and the nerviest, speediest, deadliest man with a six-gun that I ever knew.”

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1965 – The Murder (Abolition of Death Penalty) Act 1965 is given Royal Assent, formally abolishing the death penalty in the United Kingdom.

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2011 – The potentially hazardous asteroid 2005 YU55 passed 0.85 lunar distances from Earth (about 324,600 kilometres or 201,700 miles), the closest known approach by an asteroid of its brightness since 2010 XC15 in 1976.

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Almanac – October 01

1760 – William Thomas Beckford born. English novelist, a profligate and consummately knowledgeable art collector and patron of works of decorative art, a critic, travel writer and sometime politician, reputed at one stage in his life to be the richest commoner in England. He is remembered as the author of the Gothic novel Vathek and as the builder of the remarkable lost Fonthill Abbey – a superfolly in an age of folly building. Most of it collapsed under the weight of its poorly-built tower the night of 21 December 1825. The remains of the house were slowly removed, leaving only a fragment, which exists today as a private home.

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1847 – Annie Besant born. British social reformer. She was a prominent Fabian socialist in the 1880s before becoming an adherent of Theosophy in 1889. She served as international president of the Theosophical Society from 1907 until her death, and her writings are still considered some of the best expositions of theosophical belief. After immigrating to India, she became an Indian independence leader and established the Indian Home Rule League in 1916.

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1937 – The US House of Representatives passed The Marihuana Tax Act, an important bill on the path that led to the criminalization of cannabis.
 A very cunning strategy – it stipulated that it could not be sold without a license… and licenses were never issued.

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1946 – Dave Holland born. English jazz double bassist, composer and bandleader.A member of Miles Davis‘s band for a couple of years, he played on the In A Silent Way and Bitches Brew albums.

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1962 – James Meredith registered at the University of Mississippi -accompanied by 400 U.S. deputy marshals and 1000 troops to guard the campus from further trouble – there had been 2 lives lost and 75 injuries to allow Meredith to break the schools 110 year history of segregation by being the first Negro to attend classes.

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