Tag Archives: Frankenstein Sound Lab

World (Might) End Tomorrow – 21 December 2012

 

FRANKENSTEIN SOUND LAB – The World Turned Upside Down.

As some folks believe the world is due to end tomorrow, 21st December 2012,  I thought I’d better get this track posted while there’s still time.  Although not actually about the 21-12-12 possibilities, it will at least provide you with a suitable soundtrack for the last few minutes… probably the last few minutes before the next few minutes, but its always best to hedge your bets.

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FRANKENSTEIN SOUND LAB – Barnes Park, Sunderland

Another one from the Spirit Of Place project. Barnes Park in Sunderland is our favorite local public park.

Music made from photographs of the park, using the i2sm programme, plus natural sounds recorded on location.

For more on The Spirit Of Place project, see-

http://maliceinsunderland.weebly.com/spirit-of-place.html

 

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Almanac – November 28

1757 – William Blake born.  English poet, painter, and printmaker. Largely unrecognised during his lifetime, Blake is now considered a seminal figure in the history of both the poetry and visual arts of the Romantic Age. His prophetic poetry has been said to form “what is in proportion to its merits the least read body of poetry in the English language”.

 His visual artistry has led one contemporary art critic to proclaim him “far and away the greatest artist Britain has ever produced”. Although he lived in London his entire life except for three years spent in Felpham he produced a diverse and symbolically rich corpus, which embraced the imagination as “the body of God”, or “Human existence itself”.

Reverent of the Bible but hostile to the Church of England – indeed, to all forms of organised religion – Blake was influenced by the ideals and ambitions of the French and American revolutions, as well as by such thinkers as Jakob Böhme and Emanuel Swedenborg. Despite these known influences, the singularity of Blake’s work makes him difficult to classify. The 19th-century scholar William Rossetti characterised Blake as a “glorious luminary,” and as “a man not forestalled by predecessors, nor to be classed with contemporaries, nor to be replaced by known or readily surmisable successors”.

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1820 – Friedrich Engels born. German social scientist, author, political theorist, philosopher, and father of Marxist theory, alongside Karl Marx. In 1845 he published The Condition of the Working Class in England, based on personal observations and research. In 1848 he co-authored The Communist Manifesto with Karl Marx, and later he supported Marx financially to do research and write Das Kapital.

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1929 – Berry Gordy Jr. born. American songwriter,  record producer, and the founder of the Motown record label.

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Almanac – October 15

1764 – Edward Gibbon observed a group of friars singing in the ruined Temple of Jupiter in Rome, which inspired him to begin work on The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire.

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1844 – Friedrich Nietzsche born.  German philosopher, poet, composer, cultural critic, and classical philologist. He appears in the following video – can you spot him ?

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1881 – P. G. Wodehouse born. English humorist, whose body of work includes novels, short stories, plays, poems, song lyrics, and numerous pieces of journalism. He enjoyed enormous popular success during a career that lasted more than seventy years and his many writings continue to be widely read.

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1888 – The “From Hell” letter sent to investigators of the Jack the Ripper murders. Postmarked on 15 October 1888, the letter was received by George Lusk, then head of the Whitechapel Vigilance Committee, the following day.Though hundreds of letters claiming to be from the killer were posted at the time of the Ripper murders, many researchers argue that the “From Hell” letter is one of a handful of possibly authentic writings received from the murderer.

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1917 – Mata Hari died. Margaretha Geertruida “Margreet” Zelle, better known by the stage name Mata Hari, was a Dutch exotic dancer, courtesan, and accused spy who was executed by firing squad in France under charges of espionage for Germany during World War I. It’s quite possible that she was used as a scapegoat by the French military authority to obscure the failing of the French military operations at the front.

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1938 – Fela Kuti born. Nigerian multi-instrumentalist musician and composer, pioneer of Afrobeat music, human rights activist, and political maverick.

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1965 – The Catholic Worker Movement staged an anti-Vietnam War rally in Manhattan including a public burning of a draft card; the first such act to result in arrest under a new amendment to the Selective Service Act.

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1966 – Black Panther Party was created by Huey P. Newton and Bobby Seale.

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AN END TO IT….

 

 

 

An End To It…   is the final track on the 2007 album It Was A Dark & Stormy Night, which was based loosely around the prophecy of St Malachy,  who foretold the end of the Roman Catholic church. If he was correct, the next pope after the current one will be the last one.

 

This track details the fate of that last pope – beheaded, a stake driven through his heart, and buried on a dark and stormy night at a crossroads near Zagreb.

 

Of course this is just fiction (St Malachy didn’t specify such a grisly end) and be assured that no popes were harmed during the making of this track.

 

To hear other tracks from this album, or to download it free, go to:

http://maliceinsunderland.weebly.com/dark–stormy-night.html

 

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Crab Telex Myth

 

 

 

Crab Telex Myth, from the album Project X.

Why is it called Crab Telex Myth ?  There’s probably a reason, but I haven’t thought of it yet.

It does kind of sound like a Captain Beefheart title, though, which on reflection is probably as good a reason as any.

PROJECT X page on the Malice In Sunderland website:

http://maliceinsunderland.weebly.com/project-x.html

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FRANKENSTEIN SOUND LAB – Elves & Flowers XII

 

An enthusiastic audience is most important and is essential to boosting the self-confidence of the performers.

That’s why we get ours from a sound effects album – satisfaction guaranteed every time.

For more infomation, see the Elves & Flowers web page – here

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FRANKENSTEIN SOUND LAB – Elves & Flowers XI

 

Just a quick burst of sound and voice…
From the album More Songs About Elves & Flowers. There are a lot of short tracks, so we took the easy way out and gave them numbers instead of names. This therefore is track 11. If you want to hear more, you can find them here

 
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FRANKENSTEIN SOUND LAB – Land Of Ghosts

 

Just to let you know that the entire Life Is Harsh In The Land Of Ghosts Theme Park album is now available for free listen and / or download from the Malice In Sunderland website-

http://maliceinsunderland.weebly.com/land-of-ghosts.html

This was the third FSL album, recorded on 4-track cassette and largely composed using chance operations – throwing dice mainly. It’s a kind of concept album, built around the idea of a weird and rather lethal theme park –

 

Handily situated just off of Junction 13 of the A666, The Land Of Ghosts Theme Park is the perfect day out for all the family.

The kids will love the antics of the Killer Clowns…but make sure they dont get too close. Although our Rapid Response Unit can usually recover bodies before they get too badly mutilated, there is an extra charge for this service.

Gasp at the Accidental Death Of A Vampire Hunter, impaled on his own stake, drop into the seance room and eavesdrop on The Unquiet Dead or thrill to the tales of the Brain In A Jar.

Then on for a meal at our Plague Pit restaurant, or perhaps a drink or two in the Hand Of Glory bar – you’ll probably need one !

You’ll have so much fun that you wont want to ever go home again.

And if you haven’t left the park by dusk, you may not be able to.

Ever.

We’ve actually had several requests for infomation about the location of the Land Of Ghosts….  listen up, folks – it’s not real. It doesn’t exist.

But maybe it will one day…

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Almanac – August 12

30 BC – Cleopatra VII Philopator, the last ruler of the Egyptian Ptolemaic dynasty, commited suicide, allegedly by means of an asp bite.

1198 – Battle Of Llanbedr Castell-Paen, Radnorshire. One of the bloodiest and decisive battles in Welsh history, an English army under William de Breos slaughtered 3000 Welsh of the army of Gwenwynwyn, Prince of Powys, thereby putting paid to the latter’s hopes for a united Wales.

1827 – William Blake died. English poet, painter, and printmaker. Largely unrecognised during his lifetime, Blake is now considered a seminal figure in the history of both the poetry and visual arts of the Romantic Age. His prophetic poetry has been said to form “what is in proportion to its merits the least read body of poetry in the English language”. His visual artistry has led one contemporary art critic to proclaim him “far and away the greatest artist Britain has ever produced”.Although he lived in London his entire life, except for three years spent in Felpham, he produced a diverse and symbolically rich corpus, which embraced the imagination as “the body of God”, or “Human existence itself”.

Considered mad by contemporaries for his idiosyncratic views, Blake is held in high regard by later critics for his expressiveness and creativity, and for the philosophical and mystical undercurrents within his work. His paintings and poetry have been characterised as part of both the Romantic movement and “Pre-Romantic”, for its large appearance in the 18th century. Reverent of the Bible but hostile to the Church of England – indeed, to all forms of organised religion – Blake was influenced by the ideals and ambitions of the French and American revolutions, as well as by such thinkers as Jakob Böhme and Emanuel Swedenborg. Despite these known influences, the singularity of Blake’s work makes him difficult to classify.

1831 – Helena Blavatsky born. A scholar of ancient wisdom literature who along with H.S Olcott and Anagarika Dharmapala was instrumental in the Western transmission and revival of Theravada Buddhism. In 1875 Blavatsky and Olcott established a research and publishing institute called the Theosophical Society. Blavatsky defined Theosophy as “the archaic Wisdom-Religion, the esoteric doctrine once known in every ancient country having claims to civilization,” and her   extensive research into the many different spiritual traditions of the world led to the publication of what is now considered her magnus opus, The Secret Doctrine, which collates and organizes the essence of these teachings into a comprehensive synthesis. Blavatsky saw herself as a missionary of this ancient knowledge and one of the main purposes of the Theosophical Society was “to form a nucleus of the Universal Brotherhood of Humanity, without distinction of race, creed, sex, caste or color”.  Blavatsky’s other works include Isis Unveiled, The Key to Theosophy, and The Voice of the Silence.

1960 – Echo-1, the first successful communications satellite, launched.

1981 – IBM released their first personal computer.

1992 – John Cage died.  American composer, music theorist, writer, and artist. A pioneer of indeterminacy in music, electroacoustic music, and non-standard use of musical instruments, Cage was one of the leading figures of the post-war avant-garde. Critics have lauded him as one of the most influential American composers of the 20th century and he was also instrumental in the development of modern dance, mostly through his association with choreographer Merce Cunningham, who was also Cage’s romantic partner for most of their lives.

Mr. Frankenstein

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