Tag Archives: folk

Almanac – April 21

753 BC – Romulus and Remus founded Rome, according to legend.

.

.

571 – Prophet Muhammad  born in Makkah.

.

.

1918 –  German fighter ace Manfred von Richthofen, known as “The Red Baron”, was shot down and killed over Vaux-sur-Somme in France.

He was considered the top ace of  WWI, being officially credited with 80 air combat victories.

.

.

1934 – The “Surgeon’s Photograph”, the most famous photo allegedly showing the Loch Ness Monster, was published in the Daily Mail, supposedly taken by Robert Kenneth Wilson, a London gynaecologist.

.

.

1970 – The Hutt River Province Principality seceded from Australia.

The oldest micronation in Australia, the principality claims to be an independent sovereign state having achieved legal status on 21 April 1972, although it remains unrecognised except by other micronations.

The principality is located 517 km (354 mi) north of Perth, near the town of Northampton. If considered independent, it is an enclave of Australia.

The principality was founded Leonard George Casley when he and his associates proclaimed their secession from the state of Western Australia.

.

.

2003 – Nina Simone died. American singer, songwriter, pianist, arranger, and civil rights activist widely associated with jazz music.

Simone aspired to become a classical pianist while working in a broad range of styles including classical, jazz, blues, folk, R&B, gospel, and pop.

.

.

A&A forum banner

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

Almanac – February 26

1564 – Christopher Marlowe born. English dramatist, poet and translator of the Elizabethan era. Marlowe was the foremost Elizabethan tragedian of his day, and greatly influenced William Shakespeare.  Marlowe’s plays are known for the use of blank verse, and their overreaching protagonists.

.

.

1917 – The Original Dixieland Jass Band records the first jazz record – “Livery Stable Blues”  – for the Victor Talking Machine Company in New York.

 A New Orleans Dixieland jazz band, the group composed and made the first recordings of many jazz standards, the most famous being “Tiger Rag”. In late 1917 the spelling of the band’s name was changed to Original Dixieland Jazz Band.

ODJB billed itself as the Creators of Jazz, because it was the first band to record jazz commercially and to have hit recordings in the new genre. Band leader and trumpeter Nick LaRocca argued that ODJB deserved recognition as the first band to record jazz commercially and the first band to establish jazz as a musical idiom or genre.

.

.

1920 – The first German Expressionist film , Robert Wiene‘s  The Cabinet Of Doctor Caligari premièred in Berlin.  It was one of the most influential of German Expressionist films and is often considered one of the greatest horror movies of the silent era.

The film used stylized sets, with abstract, jagged buildings painted on canvas backdrops and flats. To add to this strange style, the actors used an unrealistic technique that exhibited jerky and dancelike movements.

.

.

1932 – Johnny Cash born. American singer-songwriter, actor, and author  who was considered one of the most influential musicians of the 20th century. Although he is primarily remembered as a country music icon, his songs and sound spanned other genres including rockabilly and rock and roll—especially early in his career—and blues, folk, and gospel.

.

.

1946 – Finnish observers reported the first of many thousands of sightings of ghost rockets –  rocket- or missile-shaped unidentified flying objects sighted mostly in Sweden and nearby countries.

About 2,000 sightings were logged between May and December 1946, with peaks on 9 and 11 August 1946. Two hundred sightings were verified with radar returns, and authorities recovered physical fragments which were attributed to ghost rockets.

.

Leave a comment

Filed under Almanac

Almanac – December 06

1877 – Thomas Edison, using his new phonograph, made one of the earliest recordings of a human voice, reciting “Mary Had a Little Lamb”.

.

.

1890 – Dion Fortune born.   British occultist and author. Her pseudonym (she was born Violet Mary Firth Evans) was inspired by her family motto “Deo, non-fortuna” ( “by God, not fate”).

Of her works on magical subjects, the best remembered of her books are; The Cosmic Doctrine, a summation of her basic teachings on mysticism, Psychic Self-Defense,  a manual on how to protect oneself from psychic attacks and The Mystical Qabalah,  an introduction to Hermetic Qabalah which was first published in England in 1935, and is regarded by many occultists as one of the best books on magic ever written. Though some of her writings may seem dated to contemporary readers, they have the virtue of lucidity and avoid the deliberate obscurity that characterised many of her forerunners and contemporaries.

She also  wrote about the “Magical Battle of Britain”,[ which was a purported attempt by British occultists to magically aid the war effort during World War II. Her efforts in regard to this are recorded in a series of letters she wrote at the time. The effort involved is said by some  to have contributed to her death shortly after the war ended.

.

.

1933 – U.S. federal judge John M. Woolsey ruled that the James Joyce‘s novel Ulysses is not obscene.

.

.

1949 – Leadbelly died. Huddie William Ledbetter, American folk and blues musician, and multi-instrumentalist, notable for his strong vocals, his virtuosity on the twelve-string guitar, and the songbook of folk standards he introduced.

.

.

1969 – Meredith Hunter  killed by the Hells Angels during  Rolling Stones‘s concert at the Altamont Speedway in California.  During the performance by , he  was punched by Hells Angels  serving as security guards. He subsequently drew a gun, and was stabbed to death by Hells Angel Alan Passaro.

Some claim it happened while the Stones were playing Sympathy For The Devil,  thus giving it an extra frisson, but it was actually while they were performing Under My Thumb.

Many commentators have seen this event  as the symbolic end of the Hippie dream, such as it was.

.

.

1 Comment

Filed under Almanac