Tag Archives: England

Almanac – May 19

1536 – Anne Boleyn, second wife of Henry VIII of England, was beheaded for alledged adultery, treason, and incest.

Following the coronation of her daughter, Elizabeth, as queen, Anne was venerated as a martyr and heroine of the English Reformation, particularly through the works of John Foxe.

Over the centuries, she has inspired or been mentioned in numerous artistic and cultural works, as a result, she has retained her hold on the popular imagination.

Anne has been called “the most influential and important queen consort England has ever had”, since she provided the occasion for Henry VIII to annul his marriage to Catherine of Aragon, and declare his independence from Rome.

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1649 – An Act of Parliament declaring England a Commonwealth was passed by the Long Parliament.

England would be a republic for the next eleven years.

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1925 – Malcolm X born. American Muslim minister and human rights activist.

To his admirers, he was a courageous advocate for the rights of blacks, a man who indicted white America in the harshest terms for its crimes against black Americans. Detractors accused him of preaching racism, black supremacy, and violence.

He has been called one of the greatest and most influential African Americans in history.

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Almanac – March 29

1948 – Harry Price died. British psychic researcher and author, who gained public prominence for his investigations into psychical phenomena and his exposing of fake spiritualists.

He is best known for his well-publicized investigation of the purportedly haunted Borley Rectory in Essex, England.

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Almanac – February 08

1855 – The Devil’s Footprints mysteriously appeared around the Exe Estuary in East Devon and South Devon, England.

After a heavy snowfall, trails of hoof-like marks appeared overnight in the snow covering a total distance of some 40 to 100 miles. The footprints were so called because some people believed that they were the tracks of Satan, as they were allegedly made by a cloven hoof.

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1921 – Peter Kropotkin died.  Russian zoologist, evolutionary theorist, philosopher, scientist, revolutionary, philologist, economist, activist, geographer, writer, and prominent anarcho-communist.

Kropotkin advocated a communist society free from central government and based on voluntary associations between workers. He wrote many books, pamphlets and articles, the most prominent being The Conquest of Bread and Fields, Factories and Workshops, and his principal scientific offering, Mutual Aid: A Factor of Evolution. He also contributed the article on anarchism to the Encyclopædia Britannica (Eleventh Edition).

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1926 – Neal Cassady born. A major figure of the Beat Generation of the 1950s and the psychedelic movement of the 1960s. He served as the model for the character Dean Moriarty in Jack Kerouac‘s novel On the Road.

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Holy Wells & Water Lore

 

 

http://holywells.boardhost.com

HOLY WELLS & WATER LORE is a new forum decicated to…. holy wells and water lore – rivers, lakes, pools, etc. Yeah, including the Loch Ness Monster – that’s water lore.

Anyone interested in these subjects welcome to share their knowledge, photos and videos.  Although the site will probably attract more attention from British and Irish holy wells, it’s not limited to them. Anyone, anywhere welcome.

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Almanac – July 19th

64 – Great Fire of Rome:  a fire began  to burn in the merchant area of Rome and was soon  completely out of control. According to a popular, but untrue legend, Nero fiddled as the city burned.

1553 – Lady Jane Grey was replaced by Mary I of England as Queen of England after only nine days of reign.

1860 – Lizzie  Borden born.  She was tried for killing her father and stepmother with an axe on August 4, 1892, in Fall River, Massachusetts, USA.

The murders, subsequent trial, and ensuing trial by media became a cause célèbre. Although she  was acquitted, no one else was ever arrested or tried and she has remained a notorious figure in American folklore. Dispute over the identity of the killer or killers continues to this day.

According to a popular rhyme of the time –

Lizzie Borden took an axe
And gave her mother forty whacks.
When she saw what she had done
 She gave her father forty-one.

Actually, whoever did the deed gave her (step-)mother 18 or 19   whacks and her father 11.

1919 – Following Peace Day celebrations marking the end of World War I, ex-servicemen,  unhappy with unemployment and other grievances, rioted  and burnt down Luton Town Hall.  
The riot started after members of the council arrived to read out the King’s proclamation and many in the crowd expressed their disapproval. Tension boiled over into violence and a number of protesters broke through the police line and forcibly entered the town hall. Shortly after a number of violent clashes took place, with the town hall being stormed by the crowd and eventually set on fire.

During the riot people broke into Farmers Music Shop and dragged pianos into the streets for dancing and singing, including ironically “Keep the home fires burning”. The mayor at the time, Henry Impey,  was smuggled out of Luton, never to return.

1979 – The Sandinista rebels overthrew the government of the Somoza family in Nicaragua.

Mr. Frankenstein

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