Tag Archives: Catholic

Almanac – March 16

1244 – Over 200 Cathars were burned after the Fall of Montségur.

All the people in the castle were allowed to leave except those who would not renounce their Cathar faith. A number of defenders decided to join these ranks, bringing the total number of Cathar believers destined to burn to between 210 and 215.

On March 16, led by Bishop Bertrand Marty, the group left the castle and went down to the place where the wood for the pyre had been erected.

 No stakes were needed: they mounted the pyre and perished voluntarily in the flames.

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1898 – Aubrey Beardsley died.  English illustrator and author.

His drawings in black ink, influenced by the style of Japanese woodcuts, emphasized the grotesque, the decadent, and the erotic.

He was a leading figure in the Aesthetic movement , and his contribution to the development of the Art Nouveau and poster styles was significant, despite the brevity of his career before his  death, aged 25,  from tuberculosis.

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1968 –   My Lai massacre, Vietnam.  Mass murder of between 347 and 504 unarmed civilians in South Vietnam by United States Army soldiers of “Charlie” Company of 1st Battalion, 20th Infantry Regiment, 11th Brigade of the Americal Division.

 Most of the victims were women, children, infants, and elderly people. Some of the women were gang-raped and their bodies were later found to be mutilated and many women were allegedly raped prior to the killings.

 While 26 U.S. soldiers were initially charged with criminal offenses for their actions at Mỹ Lai, only Second Lieutenant William Calley, a platoon leader in Charlie Company, was convicted. Found guilty of killing 22 villagers, he was originally given a life sentence, but only served three and a half years under house arrest.

Three U.S. servicemen who had tried to halt the massacre and protect the wounded were initially denounced by several U.S. Congressmen as traitors. They received hate mail and death threats and found mutilated animals on their doorsteps.

The three were later widely praised and decorated by the Army for their heroic actions.

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Almanac – March 09

1763 – William Cobbett born.  English pamphleteer, farmer and journalist, who was born in Farnham, Surrey. He believed that reforming Parliament and abolishing the rotten boroughs would help to end the poverty of farm labourers, and he attacked the borough-mongers, sinecurists and “tax-eaters” relentlessly. He was also against the Corn Laws, a tax on imported grain.

Early in his career, he was a loyalist supporter of King and Country: but later he joined and successfully publicised the radical movement, which led to the Reform Bill of 1832, and to his winning the parliamentary seat of Oldham. Although he was not a Catholic, he became a fiery advocate of Catholic Emancipation in Britain.

Through the seeming contradictions in Cobbett’s life, his opposition to authority stayed constant. He wrote many polemics, on subjects from political reform to religion, but is best known for his book from 1830, Rural Rides, which is still in print today.

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1895 – Leopold von Sacher-Masoch died.  Austrian writer and journalist, who gained renown for his romantic stories of Galician life. The term masochism is derived from his name.

During his lifetime, Sacher-Masoch was well known as a man of letters, a utopian thinker who espoused socialist and humanist ideals in his fiction and non-fiction.

Most of his works remain untranslated into English. The novel Venus in Furs is his only book commonly available in English… and also (coincidently ?) the name of a song by the Velvet Underground – see John Cale, below.

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1930 – Ornette Coleman born.  American saxophonist, violinist, trumpeter and composer. He was one of the major innovators of the free jazz movement of the 1960s

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1942 – John Cale born.  Welsh musician, composer, singer-songwriter and record producer who was a founding member of The Velvet Underground.

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1994 – Charles Bukowski died. American poet, novelist and short story writer. His writing was influenced by the social, cultural and economic ambience of his home city of Los Angeles.  It is marked by an emphasis on the ordinary lives of poor Americans, the act of writing, alcohol, relationships with women and the drudgery of work.

Bukowski wrote thousands of poems, hundreds of short stories and six novels, eventually publishing over sixty books. In 1986 Time called Bukowski a “laureate of American lowlife“.

Regarding Bukowski’s enduring popular appeal, Adam Kirsch of The New Yorker wrote, “the secret of Bukowski’s appeal. . . [is that] he combines the confessional poet’s promise of intimacy with the larger-than-life aplomb of a pulp-fiction hero.”

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St Teresa of Avila

 

Showcasing items from our online bookstore.

As today is the 430th anniversary of the death of St Teresa of Avila, we put before you….

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AUTHOR-          Stephen Clissold

PUBLISHED-    Sheldon Press, London. 1979

FORMAT-          Hb, 272pp, illustrated, notes, index

CONDITION–     Used…ex-library stock, so expect library stamps / marks / stickers.
                         Dust-jacket, good condition, slight wear.
                         Book – good, sound & clean condition.

 

For more than 20 years Teresa led the devout but undemanding life of a 16th-century Spanish nun. Then she became aware of a vocation to return to the simplicity and austerity of the early Carmelite Rule.

She began to experience a disturbing series  of ecstasies, visions and interior voices counselling deeper spiritual perfection and practical ways of achieving the Reform.

In the teeth of agonizing self-doubts and the scepticism of friends and confessors, Teresa founded her first convent of ‘Barefoot’ or reformed nuns and at the same time began to analyse and record the mystical graces she recieved.

The Reform spread to the friars, and Teresa spent the rest of her life tirelessly travelling and founding convents. At the same time she continued to describe her personal experiences and to expound the successive stages of the mystic way. She also kept up an immense and varied correspondence which reveals her as one of the most warm-hearted, shrewd and gifted women of a remarkable century.

This book is available for 1.50 + 2.50 Postage (UK – for locations outside UK, follow the link to the book’s page (below) and use their calculator . You’ll need to sign up for an account with our store’s host, eBid (works basically the same as eBay, and you can use your PayPal account just the same).

Will mail worldwide.

This book’s page: http://uk.ebid.net/for-sale/9780859691482-st-teresa-of-avila-carmelite-73253525.htm

Wolfs head Bookstore
 http://uk.ebid.net/perl/main.cgi?mo=user-store&title=wolfs-head-bookstore

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Almanac – September 14

HOLY NUT DAY

Ripe Hazelnuts collected today were believed to have magical properties, especially double-nuts [two on one stalk] which were said to ward off rheumatism, toothache and the spells of witches.

On the other hand…

To the Christians this is Holy Cross Day aka Holy Rood Day .

They also called it Devil’s Nutting Day and warned that anyone going nutting on this day would meet the Devil engaged in the same task.

The Devil, as some people say,
A nutting goes Holy-Rood Day.
Let women then their children keep
At home that day, better asleep
They were, or cattle to tend
Than nutting go, and meet the Fiend;
But if they’ll not be ruled by this,
Blame me not if they do amiss.

Poor Robin’s Almanack. 1693

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1752 – The British Empire adopts the Gregorian calendar, skipping eleven days (the previous day was September 2).
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1975 – The first native-born American saint, Elizabeth Ann Seton,  canonized by Pope Paul VI.  She established the first Catholic school in the nation, at Emmitsburg, Maryland, where she founded the first American congregation of Religious Sisters, the Sisters of Charity. Popularly considered a patron saint of Catholic schools.

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Almanac – July 24

St. Christina The Astonishing’s Day

Christina apparently died aged 22. Carried to church in an open coffin for requim mass, she not only came back to life but also “…soared to the beams of the roof, and there perched herself”, much to the understandable disconcertion of the congregation.

She claimed that she really had been dead, had visited Heaven, Hell and Purgatory, and then went on to spend the next 50-odd years of her life [she died again and for keeps this time on this day in 1224] generally running wild in a manner which in a less-lucky person might have resulted in accusations of witchcraft [or being undead] – as chronicled by her contemporaries,  she would throw herself into burning furnaces and there suffered great tortures for extended times, uttering frightful cries, yet coming forth with no sign of burns upon her.

In winter she would plunge into the frozen Meuse River for hours and even days and weeks at a time, all the while praying to God and imploring God’s mercy. She sometimes allowed herself to be carried by the currents downriver to a mill where the wheel “whirled her round in a manner frightful to behold,” yet she never suffered any dislocations or broken bones. She was chased by dogs which bit and tore her flesh. She would run from them into thickets of thorns, and, though covered in blood, she would return with no wound or scar.

Suprise, suprise – veneration of Christina has never been formally approved by the Catholic Church, but there still remains a strong devotion to her in her native region of Limburg.

1783 – Simón Bolívar born as Simón José Antonio de la Santísima Trinidad Bolívar y Palacios Ponte y Blanco , Venezuelan military and political leader. Together with José de San Martín, he played a key role in Hispanic-Spanish America’s successful struggle for independence from the Spanish Empire, and is today considered one of the most influential politicians in American history.

1847 – After 17 months of travel, Brigham Young led 148 Mormon pioneers into Salt Lake Valley, resulting in the establishment of Salt Lake City.

1895 – Robert Graves born. English poet, scholar/translator/writer of antiquity specializing in Classical Greece and Rome, and novelist. He produced more than 140 works, and his  poems—together with his translations and innovative analysis and interpretations of the Greek myths, his memoir of his early life, including his role in the First World War, Goodbye to All That, and his speculative study of poetic inspiration, The White Goddess—have never been out of print. Also wrote   I, Claudius.

2001 – Simeon Saxe-Coburg-Gotha, the last Tsar of Bulgaria when he was a child, was sworn in as Prime Minister of Bulgaria, becoming probably  the first monarch in history to regain political power through democratic election to a different office.

 

 

Mr. Frankenstein

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