Tag Archives: Brave New World

Almanac – November 22

1718 – Off the coast of North Carolina, British pirate Edward Teach (best known as “Blackbeard“) was killed in battle with a boarding party led by Royal Navy Lieutenant Robert Maynard.

A shrewd and calculating leader, Teach spurned the use of force, relying instead on his fearsome image to elicit the response he desired from those he robbed. Contrary to the modern-day picture of the traditional tyrannical pirate, he commanded his vessels with the permission of their crews and there is no known account of his ever having harmed or murdered those he held captive.

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1869 – In Dumbarton, Scotland, the clipper Cutty Sark was launched – one of the last clippers ever built, and the only one still surviving today.

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1946 – Aston  ‘Family Man’  Barrett born. Jamaican bass player and Rastafarian.  Played with Bob Marley and The Wailers, The Hippy Boys, and  The Upsetters. It has been stated that he  was the ‘leader’ of the backing band and responsible for many, if not all bass lines on Bob Marley’s greatest hits, as well as having been active in co-producing Marley’s albums and responsible for most overall song arrangements. He was also  the mentor of Robbie Shakespeare of the duo Sly & Robbie, and is considered one of the elder statesmen of reggae bass guitar playing.

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1963 – In Dallas, Texas, US President John F. Kennedy was assassinated and Texas Governor John B. Connally  seriously wounded. Suspect Lee Harvey Oswald is later captured and charged with the murder of both the President and police officer J. D. Tippit.

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1963 – Aldous Huxley died. English writer best known for his novels including Brave New World.  A humanist, pacifist, and satirist,  he was latterly interested in spiritual subjects such as parapsychology and philosophical mysticism. He is also well known for advocating and taking psychedelics.

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1963 – C. S. Lewis died. Irish novelist, poet, academic, medievalist, literary critic, essayist, lay theologian, and Christian apologist.  He is known for both his fictional work, especially The Screwtape Letters, and  The Chronicles of Narnia,  and his non-fiction, such as Mere Christianity, Miracles, and The Problem of Pain.

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Almanac – July 26th

1533 – Atahualpa, the 13th and last emperor of the Incas, died by strangulation at the hands of Francisco Pizarro’s Spanish conquistadors. His death marked the end of 300 years of Inca civilization.

1856 – George Bernard Shaw born – Irish writer, Nobel laureate.

1875 – Carl Jung born –  Swiss psychiatrist.



1887 – The Unua Libro (Esperanto:  First Book) was the first publication to describe the international language Esperanto (then called Lingvo Internacia, “international language”).First published in Russian  in Warsaw, by Dr. L.L. Zamenhof, the creator of Esperanto, over the next few years editions were published in Russian, Hebrew, Polish, French, German, and English.

The booklet included the Lord’s Prayer, some Bible verses, a letter, poetry, the sixteen rules of grammar and 900 roots of vocabulary. Zamenhof declared, “an international language, like a national one, is common property.” and signed the work as “Doktoro Esperanto”   –  the title stuck as the name of the language which means “one who is hoping”.

1894 – Aldous Huxley born – English author, best known for  his novel Brave New World and his experiments with  psychedelic drugs, resulting in the essays The Doors of Perception  (from which the band The Doors took their name).

1984 – Ed Gein died.  American murderer and grave robber., his crimes, committed around his hometown of Plainfield, Wisconsin, gathered widespread notoriety after authorities discovered he had exhumed corpses from local graveyards and fashioned trophies and keepsakes from their bones and skin, although he apparently drew the line at necrophilia. After police found body parts in his house in 1957, Gein confessed to killing two women.

The police investigation of his house uncovered –

    Four noses
    Whole human bones and fragments
    Nine masks of human skin
    Bowls made from human skulls
    Ten female heads with the tops sawn off
    Human skin covering several chair seats
    Nine vulvae in a shoe box
    A belt made from female human nipples
    Skulls on his bedposts
    A pair of lips on a draw string for a window-shade
    A lampshade made from the skin from a human face

Sentenced to life imprisonment in a mental hospital,  his case influenced the creation of several fictional serial killers, including Norman Bates from Psycho, Leatherface from The Texas Chainsaw Massacre and Jame Gumb from The Silence of the Lambs.

Mr. Frankenstein

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