Tag Archives: Bob Marley & The Wailers

Almanac – May11

1811 – Chang and Eng Bunker born.  Conjoined twin brothers whose condition and birthplace became the basis for the term “Siamese twins”.

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1812 – British Prime Minister Spencer Perceval  assassinated by John Bellingham in the lobby of the House of Commons, London.

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1894 – Martha Graham born. American modern dancer and choreographer whose influence on dance has been compared with the influence Picasso had on the modern visual arts,  Stravinsky had on music, or Frank Lloyd Wright had on architecture.

She danced and choreographed for over seventy years –  “I have spent all my life with dance and being a dancer. It’s permitting life to use you in a very intense way. Sometimes it is not pleasant. Sometimes it is fearful. But nevertheless it is inevitable.”

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1904 – Salvador Dalí born. Spanish surrealist painter,  best known for the striking and bizarre images. Dalí’s expansive artistic repertoire included film, sculpture, and photography, in collaboration with a range of artists in a variety of media.

Dalí attributed his “love of everything that is gilded and excessive, my passion for luxury and my love of oriental clothes” to a self-styled “Arab lineage“, claiming that his ancestors were descended from the Moors.

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1981 – Bob Marley died.  Jamaican singer-songwriter and musician.

He was the rhythm guitarist and lead singer for  The Wailers (1963-1974) and Bob Marley & The Wailers (1974–1981).

 Marley remains the most widely known and the best-selling performer of reggae music, having sold more than 75 million albums worldwide. He is also credited with helping spread both Jamaican music and the Rastafari movement to a worldwide audience.

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Almanac – February 06

1748 – Adam Weishaupt born.  German philosopher and founder of the Order of Illuminati, a secret society with origins in Bavaria.

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1945 – Bob Marley born. Jamaican singer-songwriter and musician. He was the rhythm guitarist and lead singer for the ska, rocksteady and reggae bands The Wailers (1963-1974) and Bob Marley & The Wailers (1974–1981). Marley remains the most widely known and revered performer of reggae music, and is credited with helping spread both Jamaican music and the Rastafari movement to a worldwide audience.

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1989 – Osbourne ‘King Tubby‘ Ruddock died. Jamaican electronics and sound engineer, known primarily for his influence on the development of dub in the 1960s and 1970s.
He was shot and killed outside his home in Duhaney Park, Kingston, upon returning from a session at his Waterhouse studio.

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Almanac – November 22

1718 – Off the coast of North Carolina, British pirate Edward Teach (best known as “Blackbeard“) was killed in battle with a boarding party led by Royal Navy Lieutenant Robert Maynard.

A shrewd and calculating leader, Teach spurned the use of force, relying instead on his fearsome image to elicit the response he desired from those he robbed. Contrary to the modern-day picture of the traditional tyrannical pirate, he commanded his vessels with the permission of their crews and there is no known account of his ever having harmed or murdered those he held captive.

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1869 – In Dumbarton, Scotland, the clipper Cutty Sark was launched – one of the last clippers ever built, and the only one still surviving today.

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1946 – Aston  ‘Family Man’  Barrett born. Jamaican bass player and Rastafarian.  Played with Bob Marley and The Wailers, The Hippy Boys, and  The Upsetters. It has been stated that he  was the ‘leader’ of the backing band and responsible for many, if not all bass lines on Bob Marley’s greatest hits, as well as having been active in co-producing Marley’s albums and responsible for most overall song arrangements. He was also  the mentor of Robbie Shakespeare of the duo Sly & Robbie, and is considered one of the elder statesmen of reggae bass guitar playing.

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1963 – In Dallas, Texas, US President John F. Kennedy was assassinated and Texas Governor John B. Connally  seriously wounded. Suspect Lee Harvey Oswald is later captured and charged with the murder of both the President and police officer J. D. Tippit.

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1963 – Aldous Huxley died. English writer best known for his novels including Brave New World.  A humanist, pacifist, and satirist,  he was latterly interested in spiritual subjects such as parapsychology and philosophical mysticism. He is also well known for advocating and taking psychedelics.

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1963 – C. S. Lewis died. Irish novelist, poet, academic, medievalist, literary critic, essayist, lay theologian, and Christian apologist.  He is known for both his fictional work, especially The Screwtape Letters, and  The Chronicles of Narnia,  and his non-fiction, such as Mere Christianity, Miracles, and The Problem of Pain.

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