Tag Archives: bad poetry

Carter’s Well, Low Fell, Gateshead

 

Nowadays, Carter’s Well is a Cast iron pump with a spring handle and domed cap (not working) located on Durham Road, Low Fell, now a suburb of Gateshead, Tyne & Wear  (NZ25756005).

At least, that’s its current public face – there was, and apparently still is, more to it.

Once a mere spring “oozing out of a hillside“, where in summer people had to watch all night and take water up with a saucer, the water supply to the well was substantially improved when a drift was excavated in this direction from Sheriff Hill Colliery  and water was found in old coal workings.

Thomas Wilson, chairman of the local committee at the time, described the well in his poem “Pitman’s Pay” –

 “No other spring wiv it can vie;
it is a tap that ne’er runds dry –
a cellar where a rich supply suits every rank and station.
And it awd age myekes tipple fine,
wors mun, aw think, be quite devine;
for it’s a batch of Adams wine we gat at the Creation”.

 

 

Carter’s Well was Low Fell’s main source of water until the Newcastle and Gateshead Water Company supplied the village with a water supply in the late nineteenth century. Gateshead Council closed the well in 1895 having found a sample to be contaminated with foreign bodies.

 

More photos, information (and bad poetry !) regarding this well at http://holywells.boardhost.com/viewtopic.php?id=259

 

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Almanac – September 29

Michaelmas
One of the old Quarter Days of the year, and also a time of hiring fairs

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1902 – William  McGonagall died. Scottish weaver, doggerel poet and actor. He won notoriety as an extremely bad poet who exhibited no recognition of or concern for his peers’ opinions of his work – at least that’s the official view. Contemporary accounts suggest that he was actually a pretty good performance poet,  and his works were made to hear, rather than to be read. He wrote about 200 poems, including his infamous “The Tay Bridge Disaster”, as well as one about the Victoria Hall Disaster, here in Sunderland.

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1916 – John D. Rockefeller became the world’s first billionaire during a share boom in the USA.

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1935 – Jerry Lee Lewis born. The Killer.

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1997 – Roy Lichenstein died. American pop artist. During the 1960s, along with Andy Warhol, Jasper Johns, James Rosenquist, and others he became a leading figure in the new art movement. His work defined the basic premise of pop art better than any other through parody, favoring the old-fashioned comic strip as subject matter, his work was heavily influenced by both popular advertising and the comic book style. He described Pop Art as, “not ‘American’ painting but actually industrial painting”.

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