Tag Archives: Adolf Hitler

Almanac – June 14

1928 – Che Guevara born. Argentine Marxist revolutionary, physician, author, guerrilla leader, diplomat, and military theorist.

A major figure of the Cuban Revolution, his stylized visage has become a ubiquitous countercultural symbol of rebellion and global insignia within popular culture.

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1949 – Albert II, a rhesus monkey, rode a V2 rocket to an altitude of 134 km (83 mi), thereby becoming the first monkey in space. He survived the flight but   died on impact  after a parachute failure.

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1953 – David Thomas born.  American singer, songwriter, and musician.

He was one of the founding members of the short-lived protopunk Rocket From The Tombs (1974–1975), where he went by the name of Crocus Behemoth, and of  Pere Ubu (1975–present, intermittently). He has also released several solo albums. Though primarily a singer, he sometimes plays melodeon, trombone, guitar or other instruments.

Thomas has described his artistic focus as being the “gestalt of culture, geography and sound“. Common themes crop up throughout much of his work, such as the US Interstate Highway system, images of roadside or “junk” tourist culture, Brian Wilson, AM Radio, and many others.

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1966 – The Vatican announced the abolition of the Index Librorum Prohibitorum (“index of prohibited books“), which was originally instituted in 1557.

The avowed aim of the list was to protect the faith and morals of the faithful by preventing the reading of immoral books or works containing theological errors, and noteworthy intellectuals and religious figures on the Index included Jean-Paul Sartre, Simone de Beauvoir, Voltaire, Denis Diderot, Victor Hugo, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, André Gide, Immanuel Kant, David Hume, René Descartes, Francis Bacon, John Milton, John Locke, Galileo Galilei, Blaise Pascal, Hugo Grotius and Saint Faustina Kowalska. Charles Darwin’s works were notably never included, nor was Adolf Hitler’s Mein Kampf.

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Almanac – April 30

1812 – Kaspar Hauser born. German youth who claimed to have grown up in the total isolation of a darkened cell.

Hauser’s claims, and his subsequent death by stabbing, sparked much debate and controversy.

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1896 – Reverend Gary Davis born. American blues and gospel singer and guitarist, who was also proficient on the banjo and harmonica.

His finger-picking guitar style influenced many other artists including Bob Dylan, The Grateful Dead, Jackson Browne, Townes van Zandt, Wizz Jones, Jorma Kaukonen and Godspeed You Black Emperor!.

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1945 –  Adolf Hitler and Eva Braun committed suicide after being married for one day.

Hitler shot himself and Braun took cyanide. In accordance with Hitler’s instructions, the bodies were burned in the garden behind the Reich Chancellery.

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1963 – The Bristol Bus Boycott was held in Bristol to protest the Bristol Omnibus Company‘s refusal to employ Black or Asian bus crews.

 In common with other British cities there was widespread discrimination in housing and employment at that time against “coloureds.” Led by youth worker Paul Stephenson and the West Indian Development Council, the boycott of the company’s buses by Bristolians lasted for four months until the company backed down and overturned the colour bar.

The boycott drew national attention to racial discrimination in Britain and the campaign was supported by national politicians, with interventions being made by church groups and the High Commissioner for Trinidad and Tobago.

The Bristol Bus Boycott was considered by some to have been influential in the passing of the Race Relations Act 1965 which made “racial discrimination unlawful in public places” and the Race Relations Act 1968, which extended the provisions to employment and housing.

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Almanac – September 1

1902 –  Le Voyage Dans La Lune  (A Trip to the Moon),  considered one of the first science fiction films,  released in France.  It was based loosely on two popular novels of the time: Jules Verne‘s  From the Earth to the Moon  and  H. G. Wells‘  The First Men in the Moon.

The film was written and directed by Georges Méliès, assisted by his brother Gaston. It runs 14 minutes if projected at 16 frames per second, which was the standard frame rate at the time the film was produced, and uses innovative animation and special effects, including the well-known image of the spaceship landing in the Moon’s eye.

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1939 – Adolf Hitler signs an order to begin the systematic euthanasia of mentally ill and disabled people, the programme  known as Aktion T4,  during which physicians killed thousands of people who were “judged incurably sick, by critical medical examination”. The programme officially ran from September 1939  until August 1941, but it continued unofficially until the end of the Nazi regime.

During the official stage of Action T4, 70,273 people were killed,  but the Nuremberg Trials found evidence that German and Austrian physicians continued the murder of patients after October 1941 and that about 275,000 people were killed under T4.More recent research based on files recovered after 1990 gives a figure of at least 200,000 physically or mentally handicapped people killed by medication, starvation, or in the gas chambers between 1939 and 1945.

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2005 – R. L. Burnside died.  American blues singer, songwriter, and guitarist who lived much of his life in and around Holly Springs, Mississippi. He played music for much of his life, but did not receive much attention until the early 1990s. In the latter half of the 1990s, he repeatedly recorded with Jon Spencer, garnering crossover appeal and introducing his music to a new fanbase within the underground garage rock scene.

One commentator noted that Burnside, along with Big Jack Johnson, Paul “Wine” Jones, Roosevelt “Booba” Barnes and James “Super Chikan” Johnson, were “present-day exponents of an edgier, electrified version of the raw, uncut Delta blues sound.”

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Almanac – August 3

1719“A Woman, who had served the Lady Anne Harvey for about 16 years in the Quality of a Coachman, and always behaved very well, was brought to bed of a Child, to the Inexpressible Suprize of the Family, who always took her for a Man.”

The Original Weekly Journal, 1719

1527 – The first known letter from North America  sent by John Rut while at St. John’s, Newfoundland. Rut was an English mariner  who was chosen by Henry VIII to command an expedition to North America in search of the Northwest Passage; he set sail from Plymouth with two ships, on 10 June 1527.

1916 – Sir Roger Casement hanged.  Humanitarian campaigner and an Irish patriot, poet, revolutionary and nationalist.He sought to obtain German support for a rebellion in Ireland against British rule. Shortly before the Easter Rising, he  was arrested and subsequently convicted and executed by the British for treason by John Ellis and his assistants at Pentonville Prison in London.

1934 – Adolf Hitler became  the supreme leader of Germany by joining the offices of President and Chancellor into Führer.

1955 – The English-language version of Samuel Beckett‘s play Waiting For Godot first performed, at the Arts Theatre, London.

It was not an immediate success – on hearing the now famous lines “Nothing happens, nobody comes, nobody goes, it’s awful !”, a member of the audience is said to have retorted “Hear ! Hear !”.

1966 – Lenny Bruce died. American comedian, social critic and satirist. His 1964 conviction in an obscenity trial was followed by a posthumous pardon, the first in New York state history. He was renowned for his open, free-style, dangerous and critical form of comedy which integrated politics, religion, and sex. His tumultuous private life marked by substance abuse, promiscuity, as well as his efforts to prevent his wife from working as a stripper, made him a compelling figure. He paved the way for future outspoken comedians, and his trial for obscenity, in which – after being forced into bankruptcy – he was eventually found not guilty is seen as a landmark trial for freedom of speech.
Official cause of death was “acute morphine poisoning caused by an accidental overdose.

Mr. Frankenstein

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Almanac – July 29

1848 – Battle of Ballingarry, Tipperary, Ireland – an unsuccessful nationalist revolt against British rule was put down by police. The Young Irelander Rebellion was a failed  nationalist uprising led by the Young Ireland movement, part of the wider Revolutions of 1848 that affected most of Europe.  After being chased by a force of Young Irelanders and their supporters, an Irish Constabulary unit raided a house and took those inside as hostages. A several-hour gunfight followed, but the rebels fled after a large group of police reinforcements arrived.

It is sometimes called the Famine Rebellion, as it took place during the Great Irish Famine.

1885 – Theda Bara born as  Theodosia Burr Goodman.  American silent film actress, one of the most popular of her era –  ranking behind only Charlie Chaplin and Mary Pickford – and one of cinema’s earliest sex symbols. Her femme fatale roles earned her the nickname “The Vamp”.  She made more than 40 films between 1914 and 1926, but complete prints of only six still exist.

Theda Bara” is an anagram of “Arab Death

1890 – Vincent van Gogh died, 29 hours after he had  shot himself. His reported last words were  “The sadness will last forever.”

1907 – Sir Robert Baden-Powell set up the Brownsea Island Scout camp in Poole Harbour on the south coast of England, United Kingdom. The camp ran  from August 1 to August 9, 1907, and is regarded as the foundation of the Scouting movement.

1921 – Adolf Hitler became  leader of the National Socialist German Workers Party.

Mr. Frankenstein

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Almanac – July 18th

1290 – King Edward I of England issues the Edict of Expulsion, banishing all Jews (numbering about 16,000) from England;.

1652 – On this day, according to the trial records of York Castle, Mary Fisher of Selby “did openly in the parish church speak unto Richard Calvert, minister there, being in the pulpit and preaching, these words: “Come down, come down, thou Painted Beast, come down. Thou art but an hireling, and deludest the people with thy lyes”.

1925 – Adolf Hitler‘s Mein Kampf published.

1929 – Screamin’ Jay Hawkins, American singer, born.

1937 – Hunter S. Thompson, American journalist and author, born. Thompson became a counter cultural figure as the creator of Gonzo journalism, an experimental style of reporting where reporters involve themselves in the action to such a degree that they become central figures of their stories.

1988 – Nico  died.  German singer, lyricist, composer, musician, fashion model, and actress, who initially rose to fame as a Warhol Superstar in the 1960s. She is known for both her vocal collaboration on The Velvet Underground‘s debut album, The Velvet Underground & Nico (1967), and her work as a solo artist from the late 1960s through the early 1980s. She also had roles in several films, including a cameo in Federico Fellini’s La Dolce Vita (1960) and Andy Warhol’s Chelsea Girls (1966), as herself. Nico died in July 1988, as a result of injuries sustained in a cycling accident while vacationing in Ibiza.

1992 – It was announced that Uppingham, the Leicestershire public school, was to stop mourning Queen Victoria. The boys had worn black ties since 1901.

“They look like trainee undertakers,” said the headmaster, “It was never meant to be a tradition. Its just that nobody ever made the decision to change back.”

To change back to what, was the question. No-one knew what the original colours had been, and pre-1901 photographs were, of course, in black & white. It was decided to go with Silver and Prussian Blue.

Mr. Frankenstein

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Almanac – June 30th

1837 – An act of parliament put an end to the use of the pillory as punishment in the Uk.

1859 – French acrobat Charles Blondin crossed Niagara Falls on a tightrope.

1905Albert Einstein publishesd the article On the Electrodynamics of Moving Bodies, in which he introduces special relativity.

1908 – The Tunguska Event occured in  Siberia –  an enormously powerful explosion that occurred near the Podkamennaya Tunguska River in what is now Krasnoyarsk Krai, Russia, at about 7:14 a.m. KRAT (0:14 UT).

The explosion, having the hypocenter, (60.886°N, 101.894°E), is believed to have been caused by the air burst of a large meteoroid or comet fragment at an altitude of 5–10 kilometres (3–6 mi) above the Earth’s surface. Different studies have yielded varying estimates of the object’s size, with general agreement that it was a few tens of metres across. It is the largest impact event on or near Earth in recorded history.

The explosion knocked an estimated 80 million trees down over an area covering 2,150 square kilometres (830 sq mi). It is estimated that the shock wave from the blast would have measured 5.0 on the Richter scale.

Other possible causes suggested include a crashing UFO, a Black hole passing through the Earth, anti-matter, and a side-effect of an experiment by Nikola Tesla

 

1934The Night Of The Long Knives in Germany. Adolf Hitler ordered the summary execution of those in the Nazi party who oppsed him.

 

Mr. Frankenstein

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