Category Archives: Music

A beach hut, which plays an atmospheric soundtrack inspired by the coast

A beach hut, which plays an atmospheric soundtrack inspired by the coast, has begun its journey around the country in the North-East.

Electronic pop star Martyn Ware, who was a founder member of both Heaven 17 and The Human League, has developed audio for the project and was in Seaham, County Durham, today (Wednesday, July1) for its launch.

Next week the installation will move on to Orford Ness, Suffolk and finish up in Porthgain, Pembrokeshire.

Visitors are invited to enter the mini sound booth where they can record their thoughts about what the coast means to them.

Mr Ware, who is from Sheffield, said:

 “I was very happy to do it because I have done a lot of projects concerned with preserving the acoustic ecology and recording people’s memories.

“In the case of this area and the post-industrial location, maybe people’s memories of sound that used to occur in the industrial parts of town, when there used to be a big community here, has changed.”

The recordings that people make in the hut will be used as contributions towards One and All, an online digital artwork combining audio visual and interactive landscapes.

It has been commissioned by Trust New Art, the National Trust’s contemporary arts programme, and sounduk.

Full story :  http://northstar.boards.net/thread/116/project-launched-record-sounds-coastline

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Delia Derbyshire

On Tueday 30th June Radio 4 Extra is repeating Blue Veils & Golden Sands – the remarkable story of pioneering BBC Radiophonic Workshop music composer Delia Derbyshire.

First broadcast on Radio 4, 2002.  Sophie Thompson plays Delia.

11.15 – 12:00, repeated  21:15 – 22:00, after which it should be available on the BBC iPlayer for a month.

Delia  Derbyshire ( 1937 –  2001) was an English musician and composer of electronic music and musique concrète. She is best known for her electronic realisation of Ron Grainer’s theme music for  Doctor Who and for her work with the BBC Radiophonic Workshop.

Full story : http://northstar.boards.net/thread/147/delia-derbyshire-radio-extra-30

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Kick Out The Tories

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Kick Out The Tories – Newtown Neurotics

As relevant now, sadly, as it was when first released in the early 1980s.

Lets kick out the Tories
the rulers of this land
for they are the enemies
of the British working man
and it shows,while that bastard is in unemployment grows
and it shows,in hospitals,factories and
the schools that they’ve closed.

Evil will triumph,if good men say nothing
evil will triumph, if good men do nothing
and it shows, while that bastard is in unemployment grows
and it shows, from Toxteth down to the Crumlin Road.

Lets overthrow them soon
cant you see what they’re trying to do
we’ll all be frying soon
Cant you see what they’re trying to do
lets overthrow them soon
cant you see what they’re trying to do
they just abuse their power
both black and white are being screwed.

Don’t believe every thing that you…

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Grassroots music & politics – 2

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Having started with the far right, now for the not quite so far right…the Labour Party.

Are musicians and creative people generally more likely to lean to the left, politically speaking ? It does generally seem that way.

Labour once had a good relationship with musicians – I’m particularly thinking of their engagement with Red Wedge, the collective of musicians who attempted to engage young people with politics in general, and the policies of the Labour Party in particular, during the period leading up to the 1987 general election, in the hope of ousting the Conservative government of Margaret Thatcher.

Fronted by Billy Bragg (whose 1985 Jobs for Youth tour had been a prototype of sorts for Red Wedge), Paul Weller and The Communards lead singer Jimmy Somerville, they put on concert tours and appeared in the media, adding their support to the Labour Party campaign.

Artists…

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Grassroots music and politics – 1

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Here’s an idea… forget the spin-doctors and the mainstream media and instead explore the political landscape via the music it’s inspiring.

You probably won’t have heard much, if anything, of what follows. It’s not played on the TV or radio, the political parties themselves don’t know it exists and almost certainly wouldn’t care for it if they did – with one exception. There is one party who understand the concept very well – can you guess which one ?

This is folk music (small ‘f’), music performed by folk, singing about their concerns. For the most part it’s DIY recordings and videos, probably made on no budget at all in most cases, and released into the wild via Youtube and other sites.

It’s not-for-profit, its makes no money for corporations, it almost certainly wont be on your radio. But its inventive, satirical, funny, vitriolic and often thought-provoking. What else do…

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Cassetteboy – Cameron’s Conference Rap

Conservative Party policy in under two minutes…

 

 

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Yusef Lateef R.I.P.

Yusef Lateef,  Grammy Award-winning multi-instrumentalist, composer and educator who brought the sounds of world music to jazz and became one of the first jazz musicians to convert to the teachings of Islam,  died. He was 93.

 

Lateef initially was best known as a dynamic tenor saxophonist with a big tone and a strong sense of swing, but his persistent creative and intellectual curiosity led him to the discovery of an array of other instruments as well as a fascination with various international forms of music.

He was an early advocate for the flute as a credible jazz voice, and  his performances on the oboe as early as the ’50s and ’60s were definitive – and rarely matched – displays of the instrument’s jazz capabilities.

He searched the globe for more exotic instruments, while mastering, among others, the bamboo flute, the Indian shenai, the Arabic arghul, the Hebrew shofar and the West African Fulani flute.

 

Tall and shaven-headed, his powerful presence offset by a calm demeanor and the quiet, articulate speaking style of a scholar, Lateef combined thoughtfulness and a probing intellectual curiosity with impressive musical skills. Early in his career, he established his role as a pathfinder in blending elements from a multiplicity of different sources.

 

His first recordings under his own leadership, released on the Savoy label in the mid-’50s, already revealed a fascination with unusual instruments: In addition to tenor saxophone and the flute, he also plays the arghul. Several of Lateef’s original compositions on those early albums also integrated rhythms and melodic styles from numerous global musical forms.

 

“In any given composition,” wrote Leonard Feather in The Times in 1975, “there may be long passages that involve classical influences, impressionism, a Middle Eastern flavor, or rhythmic references to Latin America.”

 

Like a number of musicians – from Duke Ellington to his contemporaries, Max Roach and Sonny Rollins – Lateef objected to the use of the word “jazz” to describe his work. He preferred, instead, the phrase, “autophysiopsychic music,” which he defined as “music which comes from one’s physical, mental and spiritual self.”

 

He also acknowledged the importance of the blues, in his music and elsewhere.

 

“The blues,” he said in an NPR interview in 2003, “is a very elegant musical form which has given birth to wonderful compositions. I recognize the blues. In fact, if the African had not been brought to America as a slave, the blues would never have been born.”

 

Lateef’s desire to pursue his own musical path — as a performer, a composer and an educator — led, in 1981, to his refusal to perform in nightclubs. For the next four years, he lived in Nigeria as a senior research fellow at Ahmadu Bello University. Returning to the U.S., he taught at the University of Massachusetts and Amherst College.

 

In the succeeding decades, Lateef performed in concert halls, colleges and music festivals in Japan, Russia, Europe, the Middle East, Africa and the U.S. He often led seminars and master classes outlining his belief in the presence of autophysiopsychic music principals in cultures around the world.

 

“To me,” he told the LA Times in 1989,” it feels as though there’s a kind of aesthetic thread running through the improvisational musics of the world. If you’re alive and your heart is beating, you’ll find it, and that’s what makes the relationship between you and the world.”

 

Yusef Lateef was born William Emanuel Huddleston on April 9, 1920, in Chattanooga, Tenn. When he was 3, he moved to Lorraine, Ohio, with his parents. In 1925 they relocated to Detroit. Music was a constant presence in his early family life.

 

He is survived by his wife, Ayesha Lateef; his son, Yusef Lateef; a granddaughter and great-grandchildren.

Source – LA Time, 24 Dec 2013

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