Almanac – February 26

1564 – Christopher Marlowe born. English dramatist, poet and translator of the Elizabethan era. Marlowe was the foremost Elizabethan tragedian of his day, and greatly influenced William Shakespeare.  Marlowe’s plays are known for the use of blank verse, and their overreaching protagonists.

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1917 – The Original Dixieland Jass Band records the first jazz record – “Livery Stable Blues”  – for the Victor Talking Machine Company in New York.

 A New Orleans Dixieland jazz band, the group composed and made the first recordings of many jazz standards, the most famous being “Tiger Rag”. In late 1917 the spelling of the band’s name was changed to Original Dixieland Jazz Band.

ODJB billed itself as the Creators of Jazz, because it was the first band to record jazz commercially and to have hit recordings in the new genre. Band leader and trumpeter Nick LaRocca argued that ODJB deserved recognition as the first band to record jazz commercially and the first band to establish jazz as a musical idiom or genre.

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1920 – The first German Expressionist film , Robert Wiene‘s  The Cabinet Of Doctor Caligari premièred in Berlin.  It was one of the most influential of German Expressionist films and is often considered one of the greatest horror movies of the silent era.

The film used stylized sets, with abstract, jagged buildings painted on canvas backdrops and flats. To add to this strange style, the actors used an unrealistic technique that exhibited jerky and dancelike movements.

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1932 – Johnny Cash born. American singer-songwriter, actor, and author  who was considered one of the most influential musicians of the 20th century. Although he is primarily remembered as a country music icon, his songs and sound spanned other genres including rockabilly and rock and roll—especially early in his career—and blues, folk, and gospel.

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1946 – Finnish observers reported the first of many thousands of sightings of ghost rockets –  rocket- or missile-shaped unidentified flying objects sighted mostly in Sweden and nearby countries.

About 2,000 sightings were logged between May and December 1946, with peaks on 9 and 11 August 1946. Two hundred sightings were verified with radar returns, and authorities recovered physical fragments which were attributed to ghost rockets.

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