Almanac – November 10

1697 – William Hogarth born. English painter, printmaker, pictorial satirist, social critic and editorial cartoonist who has been credited with pioneering western sequential art. His work ranged from realistic portraiture to comic strip-like series of pictures called “modern moral subjects”. Knowledge of his work is so pervasive that satirical political illustrations in this style are often referred to as “Hogarthian.”

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1871 – Henry Morton Stanley located missing explorer and missionary, Dr. David Livingstone in Ujiji, near Lake Tanganyika, famously greeting him with the words, “Dr. Livingstone, I presume?”

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1891 – Arthur Rimbaud died.  French poet who produced his works while still in his late teens and gave up creative writing altogether before the age of 20. As part of the decadent movement, Rimbaud influenced modern literature, music, and arts, and prefigured surrealism.

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1928 – Ennio Morricone born. Italian composer and conductor, who has written music for more than 500 motion pictures and television series, in a career lasting over 50 years.His scores have been included in over 20 award-winning films as well as several symphonic and choral pieces.

He is most famous for his work in the Spaghetti Westerns directed by his friend Sergio Leone, including A Fistful of Dollars (1964), For a Few Dollars More (1965), The Good, the Bad and the Ugly (1966), and Once Upon a Time in the West (1968), but his career includes a wide range of composition genres making him one of the world’s most versatile, prolific and influential artists.

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1940 – Screaming Lord Sutch born. English musician, pirate radio pioneer and  founder of the Official Monster Raving Loony Party, which he served as  leader from 1983 to 1999. He stood for parliament numerous times since the early 1960s, but the real loonies always beat him.

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1960 – D.H. Lawrence‘s novel Lady Chatterley’s Lover was first published in its entirety in the UK – its initial run of 200,000 copies had sold out by the end of the day.

It had been first published, in Florence, in 1928 but banned in the UK because of its sexual content [and the idea of one of the hoi polloi having it away with one of the nobs, no doubt]. A heavily edited version had been passed by the censors in 1932.

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1960 – Neil Gaiman born. English author of short fiction, novels, comic books, graphic novels, audio theatre and films. His notable works include the comic book series The Sandman and novels Stardust, American Gods, Coraline, and The Graveyard Book.

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2001 – Ken Kesey died.  American author, best known for his novel One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest (1962) and as a counter-cultural figure who considered himself a link between the Beat Generation of the 1950s and the hippies of the 1960s. “I was too young to be a beatnik, and too old to be a hippie,” Kesey said in a 1999 interview.

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